Two-year longitudinal study of poststroke mood disorders: Comparison of acute-onset with delayed-onset depression

R. G. Robinson, John R Lipsey, K. Rao, T. R. Price

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Patients who developed poststroke depression 3 to 24 months after hospital discharge (N = 21) were compared with patients who developed depression during hospitalization (N = 26) and patients who never developed depression over 24 months of follow-up (N = 15). During the acute hospitalization and at follow-up, the three groups were not significantly different in their demographic characteristics, neurological impairment, intellectual impairment, or quality of social support. The acute depression group, however, showed an increased correlation between impairment and depression from hospitalization to follow-up. Findings suggest that impairment does not produce depression, but, once depression occurs, it may interact with impairment to influence poststroke recovery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1238-1244
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume143
Issue number10
StatePublished - 1986

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Mood Disorders
Longitudinal Studies
Depression
Hospitalization
Social Support
Demography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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Two-year longitudinal study of poststroke mood disorders : Comparison of acute-onset with delayed-onset depression. / Robinson, R. G.; Lipsey, John R; Rao, K.; Price, T. R.

In: American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 143, No. 10, 1986, p. 1238-1244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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