Two surgeries do not always make a right: Spinal cord stimulation for failed back surgery syndrome

Phan Q. Duy, William S Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Failed back surgery syndrome (FBBS†) is characterized by chronic pain that persists following spine surgery. In this review, we discuss the use of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for FBBS treatment and how the clinical use of SCS may be influenced by private manufacturers. While SCS therapy can be promising for the appropriate patient, there remain knowledge gaps in understanding the full potential of SCS technology for delivering optimal therapeutic benefit. We caution that the use of SCS without a complete understanding of the technology may create exploitative situations that private manufacturers can capitalize on while subjecting patients to potentially unnecessary health and financial burdens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)323-331
Number of pages9
JournalYale Journal of Biology and Medicine
Volume91
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

Fingerprint

Failed Back Surgery Syndrome
Spinal Cord Stimulation
Surgery
Technology
Chronic Pain
Spine
Therapeutics
Health

Keywords

  • Chronic pain
  • Failed back surgery syndrome
  • Neurosurgery
  • Spinal cord stimulation
  • Spine surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Two surgeries do not always make a right : Spinal cord stimulation for failed back surgery syndrome. / Duy, Phan Q.; Anderson, William S.

In: Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, Vol. 91, No. 3, 01.09.2018, p. 323-331.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{0ad08d10e04349a2b4daacd506741ad1,
title = "Two surgeries do not always make a right: Spinal cord stimulation for failed back surgery syndrome",
abstract = "Failed back surgery syndrome (FBBS†) is characterized by chronic pain that persists following spine surgery. In this review, we discuss the use of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for FBBS treatment and how the clinical use of SCS may be influenced by private manufacturers. While SCS therapy can be promising for the appropriate patient, there remain knowledge gaps in understanding the full potential of SCS technology for delivering optimal therapeutic benefit. We caution that the use of SCS without a complete understanding of the technology may create exploitative situations that private manufacturers can capitalize on while subjecting patients to potentially unnecessary health and financial burdens.",
keywords = "Chronic pain, Failed back surgery syndrome, Neurosurgery, Spinal cord stimulation, Spine surgery",
author = "Duy, {Phan Q.} and Anderson, {William S}",
year = "2018",
month = "9",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "91",
pages = "323--331",
journal = "Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine",
issn = "0044-0086",
publisher = "Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Two surgeries do not always make a right

T2 - Spinal cord stimulation for failed back surgery syndrome

AU - Duy, Phan Q.

AU - Anderson, William S

PY - 2018/9/1

Y1 - 2018/9/1

N2 - Failed back surgery syndrome (FBBS†) is characterized by chronic pain that persists following spine surgery. In this review, we discuss the use of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for FBBS treatment and how the clinical use of SCS may be influenced by private manufacturers. While SCS therapy can be promising for the appropriate patient, there remain knowledge gaps in understanding the full potential of SCS technology for delivering optimal therapeutic benefit. We caution that the use of SCS without a complete understanding of the technology may create exploitative situations that private manufacturers can capitalize on while subjecting patients to potentially unnecessary health and financial burdens.

AB - Failed back surgery syndrome (FBBS†) is characterized by chronic pain that persists following spine surgery. In this review, we discuss the use of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for FBBS treatment and how the clinical use of SCS may be influenced by private manufacturers. While SCS therapy can be promising for the appropriate patient, there remain knowledge gaps in understanding the full potential of SCS technology for delivering optimal therapeutic benefit. We caution that the use of SCS without a complete understanding of the technology may create exploitative situations that private manufacturers can capitalize on while subjecting patients to potentially unnecessary health and financial burdens.

KW - Chronic pain

KW - Failed back surgery syndrome

KW - Neurosurgery

KW - Spinal cord stimulation

KW - Spine surgery

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85054088543&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85054088543&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Review article

C2 - 30258319

AN - SCOPUS:85054088543

VL - 91

SP - 323

EP - 331

JO - Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine

JF - Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine

SN - 0044-0086

IS - 3

ER -