Two-Decade Trends in the Prevalence of Atherosclerotic Risk Factors, Coronary Plaque Morphology, and Outcomes in Adults Aged ≤45 Years Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

Kanhaiya L. Poddar, Dhruv K. Modi, Siddharth Wayangankar, Badal Thakkar, Amar Krishnaswamy, Meera Kumari, Hazem Bdair, Karan Sud, Akhil Parashar, Mohammad Qasim Raza, Raquib Faruqui, Shikhar Agarwal, Kinjal Banerjee, E. Murat Tuzcu, Samir R. Kapadia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Data are limited about the prevalence trends of risk factors, lesion morphology, and clinical outcomes of coronary artery disease in patients, aged ≤45 years, undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), between the bare-metal stent (BMS; 1994 to 2002) and drug-eluting stent (DES; 2003 to 2012) eras. From the PCI database at the Cleveland Clinic, we identified 1,640 patients aged ≤45 years and without a history of coronary artery bypass grafting who underwent PCI from 1994 to 2012. There were 883 patients in the BMS era cohort with a mean follow-up period of 13.15 years and 757 in the DES era cohort with a mean follow-up of 5.02 years. The DES era had more obese (51.8% vs 44.7%, p <0.001) and diabetes (23.0% vs 19.5%, p = 0.09) patients. DES era patients had more B2/C lesions (74.0% vs 32.5%, p <0.001), more severe preprocedural stenosis (86.1 ± 12.9 vs 72.2 ± 21.3, p <0.001), and longer lesions (15.5 ± 9.9 vs 9.6 ± 6.8, p <0.001). No difference was observed in the 30-day mortality between the DES and BMS eras. Irrespective of era, diabetics had worse long-term mortality (19.4% vs 9.3%, p <0.001) compared with nondiabetics. Obese patients had similar long-term outcomes compared with nonobese patients. In conclusion, patients aged ≤45 years, who underwent a PCI procedure in the DES era had worse risk factor profiles, including obesity, compared with patients in the BMS era. They also had more complex lesions. Procedural and long-term outcomes of these patients have not changed between the 2 eras. Young diabetic patients have worse long-term outcomes compared with nondiabetics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)939-943
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume118
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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