TU‐A‐BRA‐03: Knowledge‐Based and Patient‐Geometry Specific IMRT Treatment Planning

B. wu, G. Sanguineti, M. Kazhdan, P. Simari, Russell H Taylor, Todd McNutt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To create an IMRT treatment planning approach by which planners can access the knowledge of prior clinical plans to control the quality of new plans. Method and Materials: Overlap volume histogram (OVH) is used to access the knowledge of prior clinical plans. It allows planners to identify a reference group of prior clinical plans that contains geometric information “similar” to a new patient. The best plan in terms of OAR sparing in the reference group will then provide input to IMRT optimization for the new patient. In a retrospective OVH‐assisted planning demonstration, 15 patients were randomly selected from a database of 91 prior head‐and‐neck patients with a three‐level prescription: 58.1 Gy, 63 Gy and 70 Gy. A leave‐one‐out methodology was applied to generate the DVHs for each OVH‐assisted plan (OP). The database‐generated DVHs were then used by a planner who had no knowledge of the clinical plans (CPs). To evaluate the effectiveness of our methodology, the dosimetric results for three sets of plans: CPs, OPs after the first‐round optimization and final OPs were compared by the Wilcoxon p test. Results: Averages of optimization rounds required for completing CPs and OPs were 27.6 and 1.9 (p<0.00001); three OPs were completed in a single optimization round. For both OPs, averages of standard deviation to the PTV63 deceased by ∼0.5 Gy (p<0.02); averages of D0.1 cc to the cord+4mm decreased by ∼6.5 Gy (p<0.0001); averages of D0.1 cc to the brainstem decreased by ∼7.5 Gy (p<0.005); averages of V(30 Gy) to the contra‐lateral parotid decreased by ∼8% (p<0.0001). Additionally, both OPs were comparable with or better than the CPs in PTV uniformity, conformity and other OAR sparing. Conclusion: The method offers a way of predicting clinically achievable doses ahead of planning, making IMRT planning no longer a trial and error process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3368-3369
Number of pages2
JournalMedical Physics
Volume37
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

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Therapeutics
Quality Control
Brain Stem
Prescriptions
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

TU‐A‐BRA‐03 : Knowledge‐Based and Patient‐Geometry Specific IMRT Treatment Planning. / wu, B.; Sanguineti, G.; Kazhdan, M.; Simari, P.; Taylor, Russell H; McNutt, Todd.

In: Medical Physics, Vol. 37, No. 6, 2010, p. 3368-3369.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

wu, B. ; Sanguineti, G. ; Kazhdan, M. ; Simari, P. ; Taylor, Russell H ; McNutt, Todd. / TU‐A‐BRA‐03 : Knowledge‐Based and Patient‐Geometry Specific IMRT Treatment Planning. In: Medical Physics. 2010 ; Vol. 37, No. 6. pp. 3368-3369.
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