TRPV channels as thermosensory receptors in epithelial cells

Hyosang Lee, Michael Caterina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels are critical contributors to normal pain and temperature sensation and therefore represent attractive targets for pain therapy. When these channels were first discovered, most attention was focused on their potential contributions to direct thermal activation of peripheral sensory neurons. However, recent anatomical, physiological, and behavioral studies have provided evidence that TRPV channels expressed in skin epithelial cells may also contribute to thermosensation in vitro and in vivo. Here, we review these studies and speculate on possible communication mechanisms from cutaneous epithelial cells to sensory neurons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)160-167
Number of pages8
JournalPflugers Archiv European Journal of Physiology
Volume451
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2005

Fingerprint

Transient Receptor Potential Channels
Sensory Receptor Cells
Neurons
Epithelial Cells
TRPV Cation Channels
Pain
Skin
Temperature
Ion Channels
Hot Temperature
Chemical activation
Communication
Therapeutics
In Vitro Techniques

Keywords

  • Epithelia
  • Ion channel
  • Keratinocytes
  • Pain
  • Skin
  • Temperature
  • Thermosensation
  • TRPV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

TRPV channels as thermosensory receptors in epithelial cells. / Lee, Hyosang; Caterina, Michael.

In: Pflugers Archiv European Journal of Physiology, Vol. 451, No. 1, 10.2005, p. 160-167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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