Tropism of sheep lentiviruses for monocytes: Susceptibility to infection and virus gene expression increase during maturation of monocytes to macrophages

H. E. Gendelman, O. Narayan, S. Kennedy-Stoskopf, Z. Ghotbi, Janice E Clements, J. Stanley, G. Pezeshkpour

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Visna lentiviruses have a natural tropism for cells of the macrophage lineage of sheep and goats, but virus replication in these cells in vivo is restricted so that only small quantities of virus are produced. One restricting factor suggested in previous studies is that virus replication is dependent on the maturity of the cells: the more mature the cell, the less restrictive the replication of the virus. Since monocytes in peripheral blood are precursors of macrophages, we investigated the effect of cell maturation on virus replication under limited control conditions in vitro by inoculating blood leukocytes with virus and retarding the maturation of monocytes to macrophages during cultivation in serum-free medium. Using enzyme markers that identified the cells in their resting monocytic stage (peroxidase) and mature macrophage stage (acid phosphatase) along with quantitative in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry with viral reagents to trace the efficiency of virus replication, we correlated virus replication with cell maturation. Only a few monocytes were susceptible to infection, and virus replication did not extend beyond a low level of transcription of viral RNA. In the acid phosphatase-positive, maturing macrophage, susceptibility of the cells to infection was increased and virus replication was greatly amplified to the level of translation of viral polypeptides. However, virus maturation was delayed by 3 days until further cell maturation had occurred. Thus, the entire life cycle of the virus, from its attachment to the target cell to its maturation in the cell, was dependent on the level of maturation/differentiation of the monocytic cell.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-74
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume58
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Lentivirus
tropisms
Tropism
Virus Diseases
monocytes
Monocytes
Sheep
Virus Replication
macrophages
Macrophages
virus replication
Gene Expression
sheep
gene expression
viruses
infection
cells
Acid Phosphatase
Viruses
acid phosphatase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Tropism of sheep lentiviruses for monocytes : Susceptibility to infection and virus gene expression increase during maturation of monocytes to macrophages. / Gendelman, H. E.; Narayan, O.; Kennedy-Stoskopf, S.; Ghotbi, Z.; Clements, Janice E; Stanley, J.; Pezeshkpour, G.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 58, No. 1, 1986, p. 67-74.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gendelman, HE, Narayan, O, Kennedy-Stoskopf, S, Ghotbi, Z, Clements, JE, Stanley, J & Pezeshkpour, G 1986, 'Tropism of sheep lentiviruses for monocytes: Susceptibility to infection and virus gene expression increase during maturation of monocytes to macrophages', Journal of Virology, vol. 58, no. 1, pp. 67-74.
Gendelman, H. E. ; Narayan, O. ; Kennedy-Stoskopf, S. ; Ghotbi, Z. ; Clements, Janice E ; Stanley, J. ; Pezeshkpour, G. / Tropism of sheep lentiviruses for monocytes : Susceptibility to infection and virus gene expression increase during maturation of monocytes to macrophages. In: Journal of Virology. 1986 ; Vol. 58, No. 1. pp. 67-74.
@article{d48f2b0878db4fc5ac6fd54983e12ce3,
title = "Tropism of sheep lentiviruses for monocytes: Susceptibility to infection and virus gene expression increase during maturation of monocytes to macrophages",
abstract = "Visna lentiviruses have a natural tropism for cells of the macrophage lineage of sheep and goats, but virus replication in these cells in vivo is restricted so that only small quantities of virus are produced. One restricting factor suggested in previous studies is that virus replication is dependent on the maturity of the cells: the more mature the cell, the less restrictive the replication of the virus. Since monocytes in peripheral blood are precursors of macrophages, we investigated the effect of cell maturation on virus replication under limited control conditions in vitro by inoculating blood leukocytes with virus and retarding the maturation of monocytes to macrophages during cultivation in serum-free medium. Using enzyme markers that identified the cells in their resting monocytic stage (peroxidase) and mature macrophage stage (acid phosphatase) along with quantitative in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry with viral reagents to trace the efficiency of virus replication, we correlated virus replication with cell maturation. Only a few monocytes were susceptible to infection, and virus replication did not extend beyond a low level of transcription of viral RNA. In the acid phosphatase-positive, maturing macrophage, susceptibility of the cells to infection was increased and virus replication was greatly amplified to the level of translation of viral polypeptides. However, virus maturation was delayed by 3 days until further cell maturation had occurred. Thus, the entire life cycle of the virus, from its attachment to the target cell to its maturation in the cell, was dependent on the level of maturation/differentiation of the monocytic cell.",
author = "Gendelman, {H. E.} and O. Narayan and S. Kennedy-Stoskopf and Z. Ghotbi and Clements, {Janice E} and J. Stanley and G. Pezeshkpour",
year = "1986",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "58",
pages = "67--74",
journal = "Journal of Virology",
issn = "0022-538X",
publisher = "American Society for Microbiology",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tropism of sheep lentiviruses for monocytes

T2 - Susceptibility to infection and virus gene expression increase during maturation of monocytes to macrophages

AU - Gendelman, H. E.

AU - Narayan, O.

AU - Kennedy-Stoskopf, S.

AU - Ghotbi, Z.

AU - Clements, Janice E

AU - Stanley, J.

AU - Pezeshkpour, G.

PY - 1986

Y1 - 1986

N2 - Visna lentiviruses have a natural tropism for cells of the macrophage lineage of sheep and goats, but virus replication in these cells in vivo is restricted so that only small quantities of virus are produced. One restricting factor suggested in previous studies is that virus replication is dependent on the maturity of the cells: the more mature the cell, the less restrictive the replication of the virus. Since monocytes in peripheral blood are precursors of macrophages, we investigated the effect of cell maturation on virus replication under limited control conditions in vitro by inoculating blood leukocytes with virus and retarding the maturation of monocytes to macrophages during cultivation in serum-free medium. Using enzyme markers that identified the cells in their resting monocytic stage (peroxidase) and mature macrophage stage (acid phosphatase) along with quantitative in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry with viral reagents to trace the efficiency of virus replication, we correlated virus replication with cell maturation. Only a few monocytes were susceptible to infection, and virus replication did not extend beyond a low level of transcription of viral RNA. In the acid phosphatase-positive, maturing macrophage, susceptibility of the cells to infection was increased and virus replication was greatly amplified to the level of translation of viral polypeptides. However, virus maturation was delayed by 3 days until further cell maturation had occurred. Thus, the entire life cycle of the virus, from its attachment to the target cell to its maturation in the cell, was dependent on the level of maturation/differentiation of the monocytic cell.

AB - Visna lentiviruses have a natural tropism for cells of the macrophage lineage of sheep and goats, but virus replication in these cells in vivo is restricted so that only small quantities of virus are produced. One restricting factor suggested in previous studies is that virus replication is dependent on the maturity of the cells: the more mature the cell, the less restrictive the replication of the virus. Since monocytes in peripheral blood are precursors of macrophages, we investigated the effect of cell maturation on virus replication under limited control conditions in vitro by inoculating blood leukocytes with virus and retarding the maturation of monocytes to macrophages during cultivation in serum-free medium. Using enzyme markers that identified the cells in their resting monocytic stage (peroxidase) and mature macrophage stage (acid phosphatase) along with quantitative in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry with viral reagents to trace the efficiency of virus replication, we correlated virus replication with cell maturation. Only a few monocytes were susceptible to infection, and virus replication did not extend beyond a low level of transcription of viral RNA. In the acid phosphatase-positive, maturing macrophage, susceptibility of the cells to infection was increased and virus replication was greatly amplified to the level of translation of viral polypeptides. However, virus maturation was delayed by 3 days until further cell maturation had occurred. Thus, the entire life cycle of the virus, from its attachment to the target cell to its maturation in the cell, was dependent on the level of maturation/differentiation of the monocytic cell.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0022517187&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0022517187&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 3005660

AN - SCOPUS:0022517187

VL - 58

SP - 67

EP - 74

JO - Journal of Virology

JF - Journal of Virology

SN - 0022-538X

IS - 1

ER -