Trichomonas vaginalis vaginitis in obstetrics and gynecology practice: New concepts and controversies

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) is the most common curable sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Annually, 7.4 million new infections are estimated in the United States, which is greater than combined new cases of Chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis. Serious adverse reproductive health outcomes including pregnancy complications, pelvic inflammatory disease, and an increased risk of HIV acquisition have been linked to TV infection. There are several sensitive and specific diagnostic tests available, including a newly approved nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) that utilizes the same instrumentation platform and clinical sample as Chlamydia and gonorrhea tests. In this article, we review TV pathogenicity, adverse reproductive health outcomes, detection, and treatment followed by clinical scenarios for which TV diagnosis may prove useful in obstetrics and gynecology practice.Target Audience: Obstetricians and gynecologists, family physiciansLearning Objectives: After completing this CME activity, physicians should be better able to incorporate TV counseling and testing into standard clinical practice, compare and contrast available TV diagnostic tests, and manage TV in pregnant and nonpregnant women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-50
Number of pages8
JournalObstetrical and Gynecological Survey
Volume68
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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