Trends of obesity and underweight in older children and adolescents in the United States, Brazil, China, and Russia

Youfa Wang, Carlos Monteiro, Barry M. Popkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Few studies have used the same references across countries to examine the trends of over- and underweight in older children and adolescents. Objective: Using international references, we examined the trends of overweight and underweight in young persons aged 6-18 y from 4 countries. Design: Nationally representative data from Brazil (1975 and 1997), Russia (1992 and 1998), and the United States (1971-1974 and 1988-1994) and nationwide survey data from China (1991 and 1997) were used. To define overweight, we used the sex- and age-specific body mass index cutoffs recommended by the International Obesity Task Force. The sex- and age-specific body mass index fifth percentile from the first US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was used to define underweight. Results: The prevalence of overweight increased during the study periods in Brazil (from 4.1 to 13.9), China (from 6.4 to 7.7), and the United States (from 15.4 to 25.6); underweight decreased in Brazil (from 14.8 to 8.6), China (from 14.5 to 13.1), and the United States (from 5.1 to 3.3). In Russia, overweight decreased (from 15.6 to 9.0) and underweight increased (from 6.9 to 8.1). The annual rates of increase in the prevalence of overweight were 0.5% (Brazil), 0.2% (China), -1.1% (Russia), and 0.6% (United States). Conclusions: The burden of nutritional problems is shifting from energy imbalance deficiency to excess among older children and adolescents in Brazil and China. The variations across countries may relate to changes and differences in key environmental factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)971-977
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume75
Issue number6
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

underweight
Thinness
Russia
Brazil
China
obesity
Obesity
body mass index
Body Mass Index
energy deficiencies
National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
national surveys
gender
Nutrition Surveys
Advisory Committees
environmental factors

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Brazil
  • Children
  • China
  • Obesity
  • Russia
  • Underweight
  • United States

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Trends of obesity and underweight in older children and adolescents in the United States, Brazil, China, and Russia. / Wang, Youfa; Monteiro, Carlos; Popkin, Barry M.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 75, No. 6, 2002, p. 971-977.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{98eba0a0cea0424ba534e2215973380c,
title = "Trends of obesity and underweight in older children and adolescents in the United States, Brazil, China, and Russia",
abstract = "Background: Few studies have used the same references across countries to examine the trends of over- and underweight in older children and adolescents. Objective: Using international references, we examined the trends of overweight and underweight in young persons aged 6-18 y from 4 countries. Design: Nationally representative data from Brazil (1975 and 1997), Russia (1992 and 1998), and the United States (1971-1974 and 1988-1994) and nationwide survey data from China (1991 and 1997) were used. To define overweight, we used the sex- and age-specific body mass index cutoffs recommended by the International Obesity Task Force. The sex- and age-specific body mass index fifth percentile from the first US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was used to define underweight. Results: The prevalence of overweight increased during the study periods in Brazil (from 4.1 to 13.9), China (from 6.4 to 7.7), and the United States (from 15.4 to 25.6); underweight decreased in Brazil (from 14.8 to 8.6), China (from 14.5 to 13.1), and the United States (from 5.1 to 3.3). In Russia, overweight decreased (from 15.6 to 9.0) and underweight increased (from 6.9 to 8.1). The annual rates of increase in the prevalence of overweight were 0.5{\%} (Brazil), 0.2{\%} (China), -1.1{\%} (Russia), and 0.6{\%} (United States). Conclusions: The burden of nutritional problems is shifting from energy imbalance deficiency to excess among older children and adolescents in Brazil and China. The variations across countries may relate to changes and differences in key environmental factors.",
keywords = "Adolescents, Brazil, Children, China, Obesity, Russia, Underweight, United States",
author = "Youfa Wang and Carlos Monteiro and Popkin, {Barry M.}",
year = "2002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "75",
pages = "971--977",
journal = "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0002-9165",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Trends of obesity and underweight in older children and adolescents in the United States, Brazil, China, and Russia

AU - Wang, Youfa

AU - Monteiro, Carlos

AU - Popkin, Barry M.

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - Background: Few studies have used the same references across countries to examine the trends of over- and underweight in older children and adolescents. Objective: Using international references, we examined the trends of overweight and underweight in young persons aged 6-18 y from 4 countries. Design: Nationally representative data from Brazil (1975 and 1997), Russia (1992 and 1998), and the United States (1971-1974 and 1988-1994) and nationwide survey data from China (1991 and 1997) were used. To define overweight, we used the sex- and age-specific body mass index cutoffs recommended by the International Obesity Task Force. The sex- and age-specific body mass index fifth percentile from the first US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was used to define underweight. Results: The prevalence of overweight increased during the study periods in Brazil (from 4.1 to 13.9), China (from 6.4 to 7.7), and the United States (from 15.4 to 25.6); underweight decreased in Brazil (from 14.8 to 8.6), China (from 14.5 to 13.1), and the United States (from 5.1 to 3.3). In Russia, overweight decreased (from 15.6 to 9.0) and underweight increased (from 6.9 to 8.1). The annual rates of increase in the prevalence of overweight were 0.5% (Brazil), 0.2% (China), -1.1% (Russia), and 0.6% (United States). Conclusions: The burden of nutritional problems is shifting from energy imbalance deficiency to excess among older children and adolescents in Brazil and China. The variations across countries may relate to changes and differences in key environmental factors.

AB - Background: Few studies have used the same references across countries to examine the trends of over- and underweight in older children and adolescents. Objective: Using international references, we examined the trends of overweight and underweight in young persons aged 6-18 y from 4 countries. Design: Nationally representative data from Brazil (1975 and 1997), Russia (1992 and 1998), and the United States (1971-1974 and 1988-1994) and nationwide survey data from China (1991 and 1997) were used. To define overweight, we used the sex- and age-specific body mass index cutoffs recommended by the International Obesity Task Force. The sex- and age-specific body mass index fifth percentile from the first US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was used to define underweight. Results: The prevalence of overweight increased during the study periods in Brazil (from 4.1 to 13.9), China (from 6.4 to 7.7), and the United States (from 15.4 to 25.6); underweight decreased in Brazil (from 14.8 to 8.6), China (from 14.5 to 13.1), and the United States (from 5.1 to 3.3). In Russia, overweight decreased (from 15.6 to 9.0) and underweight increased (from 6.9 to 8.1). The annual rates of increase in the prevalence of overweight were 0.5% (Brazil), 0.2% (China), -1.1% (Russia), and 0.6% (United States). Conclusions: The burden of nutritional problems is shifting from energy imbalance deficiency to excess among older children and adolescents in Brazil and China. The variations across countries may relate to changes and differences in key environmental factors.

KW - Adolescents

KW - Brazil

KW - Children

KW - China

KW - Obesity

KW - Russia

KW - Underweight

KW - United States

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036114198&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036114198&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 12036801

AN - SCOPUS:0036114198

VL - 75

SP - 971

EP - 977

JO - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0002-9165

IS - 6

ER -