Trends in racial/ethnic disparities in influenza vaccination coverage among adults during the 2007-08 through 2011-12 seasons

Peng Jun Lu, Alissa O'Halloran, Leah Bryan, Erin D. Kennedy, Helen Ding, Samuel B. Graitcer, Tammy A. Santibanez, Ankita Meghani, James A. Singleton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Annual influenza vaccination is recommended for all persons aged 6 months. The objective of this study was to assess trends in racial/ethnic disparities in influenza vaccination coverage among adults in the United States. Methods We analyzed data from the 2007-2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis to assess influenza vaccination coverage by age, presence of medical conditions, and racial/ethnic groups during the 2007-08 through 2011-12 seasons. Results During the 2011-12 season, influenza vaccination coverage was significantly lower among non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics compared with non-Hispanic whites among most of the adult subgroups, with smaller disparities observed for adults age 18-49 years compared with other age groups. Vaccination coverage for non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic adults increased significantly from the 2007-08 through the 2011-12 season for most of the adult subgroups based on the NHIS (test for trend, P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)763-769
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
Volume42
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
  • Immunization
  • National Health Interview Survey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Medicine(all)

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