Tendances de l’incidence des maladies infectieuses chez les enfants en Afghanistan à l’heure de l’élargissement des services de santé publique

Translated title of the contribution: Trends in infectious disease incidence among children in Afghanistan at a time of public health services expansion

M. Y. Anwar, G. Burnham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study reviewed trends in the incidence of common communicable diseases among children under five years in Afghanistan between 2005 and 2013, a period of expansion of public health services. New visits to outpatient clinics constituted the denominator for calculating proportions. In 2013, almost three-quarters of all new visits of children to public health services were for an infectious disease, with respiratory infections the most common. Because of inconsistent data collection for some infections early in the period, the trend for infectious diseases as a whole cannot be estimated. However, there was a statistically significant downward trend in the proportion of new visits that were diagnosed as one of the 11 leading communicable diseases from 74.5% in 2005 to 62.1% in 2013 (P < 0.001). There was no difference in communicable disease patterns between provinces, but a higher per capita consultation rate was associated with a higher proportion of the leading infections (P = 0.008). Recent improvements in maternal health, hygiene, and preventive services may have had an impact in reducing the burden of infections.

Translated title of the contributionTrends in infectious disease incidence among children in Afghanistan at a time of public health services expansion
Original languageFrench
Pages (from-to)778-785
Number of pages8
JournalEastern Mediterranean Health Journal
Volume22
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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