Trends in ecstasy use in the United States from 1995 to 2001: Comparison with marijuana users and association with other drug use

Silvia S. Martins, Guido Mazzotti, Howard D. Chilcoat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study aims to estimate changes in the prevalence of ecstasy use over time, analyze the overlap of ecstasy use and other drug use, and compare other drug use in ecstasy versus marijuana users. The authors hypothesized that ecstasy users early in the "epidemic" would be polydrug users and that associations between ecstasy and other drug use would diminish as the prevalence of ecstasy use increased. Data were drawn from public use data files from the 1995, 1997, 1999, and 2001 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse. Ecstasy use increased in the U.S. population and the prevalence was greater in younger age groups. Ecstasy users were likely to use a variety of other drugs; however, association of ecstasy use with other drug use was strongest early in the "epidemic," diminishing as the number of new users increased. Later, more drug-naive adolescents and young adults began experimenting with ecstasy. These results can orient prevention strategies that target ecstasy users.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)244-252
Number of pages9
JournalExperimental and clinical psychopharmacology
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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