Trends in Beverage Consumption Among Children and Adults, 2003-2014

Sara N. Bleich, Kelsey A. Vercammen, Jonathan Wyatt Koma, Zhonghe Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: This study aimed to provide the most recent national estimates for beverage consumption among children and adults in the United States. Methods: Dietary data were collected from 18,600 children aged 2 to 19 years and from 27,652 adults aged ≥ 20 years in the 2003 to 2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Total beverage and sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption was measured by 24-hour dietary recall. Results: From 2003 to 2014, per capita consumption of all beverages declined significantly among children (473.8-312.6 calories; P < 0.001) and adults (425.0-341.1 calories; P < 0.001). In the 2013-2014 survey, 60.7% of children and 50.0% of adults drank SSBs on a given day, which is significantly lower than 2003-2004, when 79.7% of children and 61.5% of adults reported drinking SSBs. From 2003 to 2014, per capita consumption of SSBs declined from 224.6 calories to 132.5 calories (P < 0.001) for children and from 190.4 calories to 137.6 calories (P < 0.001) for adults. The absolute levels for the percentage of SSB drinkers and per capita consumption of SSBs were highest among black, Mexican American, and non-Mexican Hispanic children, adolescents, and young adults for all years of the study. Conclusions: Overall, beverage and SSB consumption declined for children and adults from 2003 to 2014. The levels of consumption are highest among black, Mexican American, and non-Mexican Hispanic participants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)432-441
Number of pages10
JournalObesity
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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