Trends in abuse of OxyContin® and other opioid analgesics in the United States: 2002-2004

Theodore J. Cicero, James A. Inciardi, Alvaro Munoz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OxyContin® (Purdue Pharma L.P., Stamford, Conn) was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1995 as a sustained-release preparation of oxycodone hydrochloride and was thought to have much lower abuse potential than immediate-release oxycodone because of its slow-release properties. However, beginning in 2000, widespread reports of OxyContin® abuse surfaced. In response, Purdue Pharma L.P. sponsored the development of a proactive abuse surveillance program, named the Researched Abuse, Diversion and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS®) system. In this paper, we describe results obtained from one aspect of RADARS - the use of drug abuse experts (ie, key informants) - as a source of data on the prevalence and magnitude of abuse of prescription drugs. The results indicate that prescription drug abuse has become prevalent, with cases reported in 60% of the zip codes surveyed. The prevalence of abuse was rank ordered as follows: OxyContin <hydrocodone > other oxycodone > methadone > morphine > hydromorphone > fentanyl > buprenorphine. In terms of the magnitude of abuse (

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)662-672
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Pain
Volume6
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2005

Fingerprint

Oxycodone
Opioid Analgesics
Prescription Drug Misuse
Hydromorphone
Delayed-Action Preparations
Buprenorphine
Information Storage and Retrieval
Methadone
Fentanyl
United States Food and Drug Administration
Morphine
Substance-Related Disorders

Keywords

  • Opioid analgesic abuse
  • OxyContin abuse
  • Postmarketing surveillance
  • Prescription drug abuse
  • Risk management program
  • Trends in prescription drug abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Trends in abuse of OxyContin® and other opioid analgesics in the United States : 2002-2004. / Cicero, Theodore J.; Inciardi, James A.; Munoz, Alvaro.

In: Journal of Pain, Vol. 6, No. 10, 10.2005, p. 662-672.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cicero, Theodore J. ; Inciardi, James A. ; Munoz, Alvaro. / Trends in abuse of OxyContin® and other opioid analgesics in the United States : 2002-2004. In: Journal of Pain. 2005 ; Vol. 6, No. 10. pp. 662-672.
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