Treatment of tardive dyskinesia with vitamin E

Michael F. Egan, Thomas Hyde, Gregory W. Albers, Ahmed Elkashef, Robert C. Alexander, Alison Reeve, Alexander Blum, Rodolfo E. Saenz, Richard Jed Wyatt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Vitamin E (α-tocopherol), a free-radical scavenger, has been reported to improve symptoms of tardive dyskinesia. The authors attempted to replicate this finding under more controlled conditions in a larger study group. Method: Fifteen inpatients and six outpatients with tardive dyskinesia received up to 1600 IU/day of vitamin E for 6 weeks in a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study. Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS) examinations of these patients were videotaped and rated independently by two trained raters. Levels of neuroleptic medication and vitamin E were measured during both treatment periods. Eighteen patients who demonstrated high blood levels of vitamin E were included in the data analysis. Results: Vitamin E levels were significantly higher while the patients were receiving vitamin E than while they were receiving placebo. For all 18 patients, there were no significant differences between AIMS scores after receiving vitamin E and AIMS scores after receiving placebo. In agreement with previous studies, however, the nine patients who had had tardive dyskinesia for 5 years or less had significantly lower AIMS scores after receiving vitamin E than after receiving placebo. There were no changes in neuroleptic levels during vitamin E treatment. Conclusions: Vitamin E had a minor beneficial effect on tardive dyskinesia ratings in a selected group of patients who had had tardive dyskinesia for 5 years or less. This effect was not due to an increase in blood levels of neuroleptic medications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)773-777
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume149
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Vitamin E
Placebos
Antipsychotic Agents
Therapeutics
Tardive Dyskinesia
Free Radical Scavengers
Tocopherols
Cross-Over Studies
Inpatients
Outpatients
Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Egan, M. F., Hyde, T., Albers, G. W., Elkashef, A., Alexander, R. C., Reeve, A., ... Wyatt, R. J. (1992). Treatment of tardive dyskinesia with vitamin E. American Journal of Psychiatry, 149(6), 773-777.

Treatment of tardive dyskinesia with vitamin E. / Egan, Michael F.; Hyde, Thomas; Albers, Gregory W.; Elkashef, Ahmed; Alexander, Robert C.; Reeve, Alison; Blum, Alexander; Saenz, Rodolfo E.; Wyatt, Richard Jed.

In: American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 149, No. 6, 1992, p. 773-777.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Egan, MF, Hyde, T, Albers, GW, Elkashef, A, Alexander, RC, Reeve, A, Blum, A, Saenz, RE & Wyatt, RJ 1992, 'Treatment of tardive dyskinesia with vitamin E', American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 149, no. 6, pp. 773-777.
Egan MF, Hyde T, Albers GW, Elkashef A, Alexander RC, Reeve A et al. Treatment of tardive dyskinesia with vitamin E. American Journal of Psychiatry. 1992;149(6):773-777.
Egan, Michael F. ; Hyde, Thomas ; Albers, Gregory W. ; Elkashef, Ahmed ; Alexander, Robert C. ; Reeve, Alison ; Blum, Alexander ; Saenz, Rodolfo E. ; Wyatt, Richard Jed. / Treatment of tardive dyskinesia with vitamin E. In: American Journal of Psychiatry. 1992 ; Vol. 149, No. 6. pp. 773-777.
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