Treatment of macular edema due to retinal vein occlusions

Roomasa Channa, Michael Smith, Peter A Campochiaro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is a prevalent retinal vascular disease, second only to diabetic retinopathy. Previously there was no treatment for central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and patients were simply observed for the development of severe complications, generally resulting in poor visual outcomes. The only treatment for branch vein occlusion (BRVO) was grid laser photocoagulation, which reduces edema very slowly and provides benefit in some, but not all patients. Within the past year, clinical trials have demonstrated the effects of three new pharmacologic treatments, ranibizumab, triamcinolone acetonide, and dexamethasone implants. The benefit/risk ratio is best for intraocular injections of ranibizumab, making this first-line therapy for most patients with CRVO or BRVO, while intraocular steroids are likely to play adjunctive roles. Standard care for patients with RVO has changed and will continue to evolve as results with other new agents are revealed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)705-713
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Ophthalmology
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Retinal Vein Occlusion
Macular Edema
Retinal Vein
Veins
Intraocular Injections
Triamcinolone Acetonide
Retinal Diseases
Retinal Vessels
Light Coagulation
Diabetic Retinopathy
Therapeutics
Vascular Diseases
Dexamethasone
Edema
Patient Care
Lasers
Odds Ratio
Steroids
Clinical Trials
Ranibizumab

Keywords

  • Dexamethosone implant
  • Ischemia
  • Sustained release
  • Triamcinolone acetonide
  • Vascular endothelial growth factor
  • Vascular leakage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Treatment of macular edema due to retinal vein occlusions. / Channa, Roomasa; Smith, Michael; Campochiaro, Peter A.

In: Clinical Ophthalmology, Vol. 5, No. 1, 2011, p. 705-713.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Channa, Roomasa ; Smith, Michael ; Campochiaro, Peter A. / Treatment of macular edema due to retinal vein occlusions. In: Clinical Ophthalmology. 2011 ; Vol. 5, No. 1. pp. 705-713.
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