Treatment of hemorrhagic head and neck lesions by direct puncture and nBCA embolization

Gerard Deib, Amgad El Mekabaty, Philippe Gailloud, Monica Pearl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Life-threatening bleeding in the head and neck region requires urgent management. These hemorrhagic lesions, for example, a ruptured pseudoaneurysm, are often treated by transarterial embolization (TAE), but prior intervention or surgery, inflammation, anatomic variants, and vessel tortuosity may render an endovascular approach challenging, time-consuming, and sometimes impossible. We report two cases of severe head and neck hemorrhages successfully embolized with n-butyl cyanoacrylate via direct puncture, and propose this approach as a fast, safe, and effective alternative to TAE.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberbcr-2017-013335
JournalBMJ Case Reports
Volume2017
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Punctures
Neck
Head
Hemorrhage
Cyanoacrylates
False Aneurysm
Inflammation
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • intervention
  • liquid embolic material
  • neck
  • technique

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Treatment of hemorrhagic head and neck lesions by direct puncture and nBCA embolization. / Deib, Gerard; El Mekabaty, Amgad; Gailloud, Philippe; Pearl, Monica.

In: BMJ Case Reports, Vol. 2017, bcr-2017-013335, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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