Treatment of children with progressive or recurrent brain tumors with carboplatin or iproplatin: A pediatric oncology group randomized phase II study

Henry S. Friedman, Jeffrey P. Krischer, Peter Burger, W. Jerry Oakes, Beverly Hockenberger, M. David Weiner, John M. Falletta, Donald Norris, Abdel H. Ragab, Donald H. Mahoney, Michael V. Whitehead, Larry E. Kun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) conducted a randomized phase II study to evaluate the activity of carboplatin and iproplatin in children with progressive or recurrent brain tumors. Patients and Methods: The study was designed to evaluate the activity of these agents and to compare the toxicities associated with their use. Treatment consisted of carboplatin 560 mg/m2 at 4-week intervals or iproplatin 270 mg/m2 at 3-week intervals. Results: The major toxicity observed was myelosuppression, particularly thrombocytopenia, for both agents. Otofoxicity (grade 1 or 2) was seen in 2.5% of patients treated with carboplatin and 1.3% of patients treated with iproplatin. The majority of patients with low-grade astrocytic neoplasms treated with carboplatin (nine of 12 patients) or iproplatin (eight of 12 patients) demonstrated tumor response or prolonged stable disease that persisted off-therapy. The duration of stable disease produced by carboplatin was particularly striking, ranging from 2 months to 68+ months (median, 40+ months). Neither drug demonstrated appreciable activity in the treatment of medulloblastoma (two of 26 responses to carboplatin, one of 14 responses to iproplatin), ependymoma (two of 17 responses to carboplatin, none of seven responses to iproplatin), high-grade glioma (two of 19 responses to carboplatin, one of 14 responses to iproplatin), or brain-stem tumors (one of 23 responses to carboplatin, none of 14 responses to iproplatin). Conclusion: Carboplatin is active against low-grade gliomas. Further evaluation of the role of carboplatin in the preirradiation treatment of children with low-grade gliomas of the optic pathway is currently underway in a clinical trial.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)249-256
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume10
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Carboplatin
Brain Neoplasms
Pediatrics
Therapeutics
Glioma
iproplatin
Optic Nerve Glioma
Brain Stem Neoplasms
Ependymoma
Medulloblastoma
Thrombocytopenia
Neoplasms
Clinical Trials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Friedman, H. S., Krischer, J. P., Burger, P., Oakes, W. J., Hockenberger, B., Weiner, M. D., ... Kun, L. E. (1992). Treatment of children with progressive or recurrent brain tumors with carboplatin or iproplatin: A pediatric oncology group randomized phase II study. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 10(2), 249-256.

Treatment of children with progressive or recurrent brain tumors with carboplatin or iproplatin : A pediatric oncology group randomized phase II study. / Friedman, Henry S.; Krischer, Jeffrey P.; Burger, Peter; Oakes, W. Jerry; Hockenberger, Beverly; Weiner, M. David; Falletta, John M.; Norris, Donald; Ragab, Abdel H.; Mahoney, Donald H.; Whitehead, Michael V.; Kun, Larry E.

In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 10, No. 2, 1992, p. 249-256.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Friedman, HS, Krischer, JP, Burger, P, Oakes, WJ, Hockenberger, B, Weiner, MD, Falletta, JM, Norris, D, Ragab, AH, Mahoney, DH, Whitehead, MV & Kun, LE 1992, 'Treatment of children with progressive or recurrent brain tumors with carboplatin or iproplatin: A pediatric oncology group randomized phase II study', Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 249-256.
Friedman, Henry S. ; Krischer, Jeffrey P. ; Burger, Peter ; Oakes, W. Jerry ; Hockenberger, Beverly ; Weiner, M. David ; Falletta, John M. ; Norris, Donald ; Ragab, Abdel H. ; Mahoney, Donald H. ; Whitehead, Michael V. ; Kun, Larry E. / Treatment of children with progressive or recurrent brain tumors with carboplatin or iproplatin : A pediatric oncology group randomized phase II study. In: Journal of Clinical Oncology. 1992 ; Vol. 10, No. 2. pp. 249-256.
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abstract = "Purpose: The Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) conducted a randomized phase II study to evaluate the activity of carboplatin and iproplatin in children with progressive or recurrent brain tumors. Patients and Methods: The study was designed to evaluate the activity of these agents and to compare the toxicities associated with their use. Treatment consisted of carboplatin 560 mg/m2 at 4-week intervals or iproplatin 270 mg/m2 at 3-week intervals. Results: The major toxicity observed was myelosuppression, particularly thrombocytopenia, for both agents. Otofoxicity (grade 1 or 2) was seen in 2.5{\%} of patients treated with carboplatin and 1.3{\%} of patients treated with iproplatin. The majority of patients with low-grade astrocytic neoplasms treated with carboplatin (nine of 12 patients) or iproplatin (eight of 12 patients) demonstrated tumor response or prolonged stable disease that persisted off-therapy. The duration of stable disease produced by carboplatin was particularly striking, ranging from 2 months to 68+ months (median, 40+ months). Neither drug demonstrated appreciable activity in the treatment of medulloblastoma (two of 26 responses to carboplatin, one of 14 responses to iproplatin), ependymoma (two of 17 responses to carboplatin, none of seven responses to iproplatin), high-grade glioma (two of 19 responses to carboplatin, one of 14 responses to iproplatin), or brain-stem tumors (one of 23 responses to carboplatin, none of 14 responses to iproplatin). Conclusion: Carboplatin is active against low-grade gliomas. Further evaluation of the role of carboplatin in the preirradiation treatment of children with low-grade gliomas of the optic pathway is currently underway in a clinical trial.",
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T2 - A pediatric oncology group randomized phase II study

AU - Friedman, Henry S.

AU - Krischer, Jeffrey P.

AU - Burger, Peter

AU - Oakes, W. Jerry

AU - Hockenberger, Beverly

AU - Weiner, M. David

AU - Falletta, John M.

AU - Norris, Donald

AU - Ragab, Abdel H.

AU - Mahoney, Donald H.

AU - Whitehead, Michael V.

AU - Kun, Larry E.

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N2 - Purpose: The Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) conducted a randomized phase II study to evaluate the activity of carboplatin and iproplatin in children with progressive or recurrent brain tumors. Patients and Methods: The study was designed to evaluate the activity of these agents and to compare the toxicities associated with their use. Treatment consisted of carboplatin 560 mg/m2 at 4-week intervals or iproplatin 270 mg/m2 at 3-week intervals. Results: The major toxicity observed was myelosuppression, particularly thrombocytopenia, for both agents. Otofoxicity (grade 1 or 2) was seen in 2.5% of patients treated with carboplatin and 1.3% of patients treated with iproplatin. The majority of patients with low-grade astrocytic neoplasms treated with carboplatin (nine of 12 patients) or iproplatin (eight of 12 patients) demonstrated tumor response or prolonged stable disease that persisted off-therapy. The duration of stable disease produced by carboplatin was particularly striking, ranging from 2 months to 68+ months (median, 40+ months). Neither drug demonstrated appreciable activity in the treatment of medulloblastoma (two of 26 responses to carboplatin, one of 14 responses to iproplatin), ependymoma (two of 17 responses to carboplatin, none of seven responses to iproplatin), high-grade glioma (two of 19 responses to carboplatin, one of 14 responses to iproplatin), or brain-stem tumors (one of 23 responses to carboplatin, none of 14 responses to iproplatin). Conclusion: Carboplatin is active against low-grade gliomas. Further evaluation of the role of carboplatin in the preirradiation treatment of children with low-grade gliomas of the optic pathway is currently underway in a clinical trial.

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