Treatment of acute focal cerebral ischemia with prostacyclin

I. Awad, J. R. Little, F. Lucas, V. Skrinska, R. Slugg, Ronald P Lesser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The object of this investigation was to study the effects of prostacyclin (PGI2) upon the evolution of acute focal cerebral ischemia in the cat. Twenty-five fasted adult cats, lightly anesthetized with nitrous oxide, underwent right middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion. Eleven cats received an intracarotid infusion of PGI2 in buffered saline pH 10.5 (100 ng/kg/min at 0.01 ml/kg/min), and 11 cats received intracarotid buffered saline pH 10.5 (0.01 ml/kg/min) without therapeutic agents. Treatment with PGI2 was started upon MCA occlusion and continued for 6 hours. Thirty minutes prior to perfusion, the animals were given fluorescein and Evans blue by intravenous injection. The cats were perfused-fixed in vivo with carbon and buffered formalin 6 hours after MCA occlusion. Another 3 cats received tritium labeled intracarotid PGI2, and peripheral venous samples were collected and assayed for PGI2 plasma levels. Mean arterial pressure was stable in PGI2 treated animals during 6 hours of MCA occlusion, while untreated cats had significant progressive hypertension during that period. The rCBF (measured by the intracarotid 133Xe method) decreased markedly in all animals immediately upon MCA occlusion. However, untreated animals had a significant progressive improvement in rCBF during the occlusion period, while PGI2 treated animals had no such improvement. Quantitative EEG changes, gross edema, areas of fluorescein extravasation, patterns of carbon perfusion, and infarct size were not significantly different in the two groups. While most untreated animals had marked Evans blue extravasation after 6 hours of MCA occlusion, most PGI2 treated animals had no such extravasation, indicating some protection of the blood-brain barrier in these animals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)203-209
Number of pages7
JournalStroke
Volume14
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1983
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Epoprostenol
Brain Ischemia
Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction
Cats
Evans Blue
Therapeutics
Fluorescein
Carbon
Perfusion
Tritium
Nitrous Oxide
Blood-Brain Barrier
Intravenous Injections
Formaldehyde
Electroencephalography
Edema
Arterial Pressure
Hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Awad, I., Little, J. R., Lucas, F., Skrinska, V., Slugg, R., & Lesser, R. P. (1983). Treatment of acute focal cerebral ischemia with prostacyclin. Stroke, 14(2), 203-209.

Treatment of acute focal cerebral ischemia with prostacyclin. / Awad, I.; Little, J. R.; Lucas, F.; Skrinska, V.; Slugg, R.; Lesser, Ronald P.

In: Stroke, Vol. 14, No. 2, 1983, p. 203-209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Awad, I, Little, JR, Lucas, F, Skrinska, V, Slugg, R & Lesser, RP 1983, 'Treatment of acute focal cerebral ischemia with prostacyclin', Stroke, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 203-209.
Awad I, Little JR, Lucas F, Skrinska V, Slugg R, Lesser RP. Treatment of acute focal cerebral ischemia with prostacyclin. Stroke. 1983;14(2):203-209.
Awad, I. ; Little, J. R. ; Lucas, F. ; Skrinska, V. ; Slugg, R. ; Lesser, Ronald P. / Treatment of acute focal cerebral ischemia with prostacyclin. In: Stroke. 1983 ; Vol. 14, No. 2. pp. 203-209.
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