Treatment and survival for women with fallopian tube carcinoma: A population-based study

Carol Kosary, Edward L. Trimble

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective. The objective of this study was to evaluate treatment and survival for women with fallopian tube carcinoma in a population-based data set. Methods. Using the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, we identified 416 women with fallopian tube carcinoma diagnosed between 1990 and 1997. We analyzed treatment and 5-year relative survival. We also compared survival to that of 9032 women with epithelial ovarian cancer diagnosed between 1991 and 1997. Results. Almost half of those diagnosed with stage I/II disease did not undergo surgical evaluation of lymph nodes. Most women with stage I/II disease were treated with surgery alone, while most women with stage III/IV disease were treated with surgery and chemotherapy. Five-year relative survival by FIGO stage was as follows: stage I (N = 102), 95%; stage II (N = 29), 75%; stage III (N = 52), 69%; stage IV (N = 151), 45%. Conclusions. We observed better survival, stage by stage, for women with fallopian tube carcinoma than for women with epithelial ovarian cancer in this population-based data set. It is possible that some patients with advanced, bulky carcinoma arising in the fallopian tube may have been classified as having ovarian or primary peritoneal cancer. Women with fallopian tube cancer should be treated in accordance with the same guidelines for surgical staging, debulking, and adjuvant chemotherapy as for women with epithelial ovarian cancer. Further studies, both laboratory and clinical, are needed to delineate the differences between fallopian and ovarian cancers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)190-191
Number of pages2
JournalGynecologic oncology
Volume86
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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