Treated invasive cervical carcinoma utility of computed tomography in distinguishing between skeletal metastases and radiation necrosis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The bony pelvis should be carefully evaluated on computed tomography (CT) scans of the lower abdomen and pelvis performed for staging cervical cancer or for evaluating suspected recurrence. CT provides optimal imaging of the spine and pelvis, frequently providing a clinically relevant supplement to bone scan or plain film information. In a study of eight patients with skeletal metastases from cervical carcinoma and three cases of radiation osteitis, overlap existed in their imaging characteristics. Metastases were always lytic but nearby sclerotic areas from radiation were often present. Radiation osteitis may be lytic, sclerotic, or mixed, and both may avidly accumulate bone-scanning radiotracers. The absence of a soft tissue mass, slow progression, blastic elements, and sharply defined borders on CT suggest radiation necrosis. However, in some lesions within a radiation portal, biopsy or MRI may be required for final diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)147-153
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Imaging
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1989

Fingerprint

Necrosis
Tomography
Radiation
Neoplasm Metastasis
Carcinoma
Pelvis
Osteitis
Bone and Bones
Motion Pictures
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Abdomen
Spine
Biopsy
Recurrence

Keywords

  • Bone Scintigraphy
  • Cervical carcinoma
  • Radiation osteitis
  • Skeletal metastases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

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title = "Treated invasive cervical carcinoma utility of computed tomography in distinguishing between skeletal metastases and radiation necrosis",
abstract = "The bony pelvis should be carefully evaluated on computed tomography (CT) scans of the lower abdomen and pelvis performed for staging cervical cancer or for evaluating suspected recurrence. CT provides optimal imaging of the spine and pelvis, frequently providing a clinically relevant supplement to bone scan or plain film information. In a study of eight patients with skeletal metastases from cervical carcinoma and three cases of radiation osteitis, overlap existed in their imaging characteristics. Metastases were always lytic but nearby sclerotic areas from radiation were often present. Radiation osteitis may be lytic, sclerotic, or mixed, and both may avidly accumulate bone-scanning radiotracers. The absence of a soft tissue mass, slow progression, blastic elements, and sharply defined borders on CT suggest radiation necrosis. However, in some lesions within a radiation portal, biopsy or MRI may be required for final diagnosis.",
keywords = "Bone Scintigraphy, Cervical carcinoma, Radiation osteitis, Skeletal metastases",
author = "Yousem, {David Mark} and Donna Magid and Scott, {William W.} and Fishman, {Elliot K}",
year = "1989",
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AU - Yousem, David Mark

AU - Magid, Donna

AU - Scott, William W.

AU - Fishman, Elliot K

PY - 1989

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N2 - The bony pelvis should be carefully evaluated on computed tomography (CT) scans of the lower abdomen and pelvis performed for staging cervical cancer or for evaluating suspected recurrence. CT provides optimal imaging of the spine and pelvis, frequently providing a clinically relevant supplement to bone scan or plain film information. In a study of eight patients with skeletal metastases from cervical carcinoma and three cases of radiation osteitis, overlap existed in their imaging characteristics. Metastases were always lytic but nearby sclerotic areas from radiation were often present. Radiation osteitis may be lytic, sclerotic, or mixed, and both may avidly accumulate bone-scanning radiotracers. The absence of a soft tissue mass, slow progression, blastic elements, and sharply defined borders on CT suggest radiation necrosis. However, in some lesions within a radiation portal, biopsy or MRI may be required for final diagnosis.

AB - The bony pelvis should be carefully evaluated on computed tomography (CT) scans of the lower abdomen and pelvis performed for staging cervical cancer or for evaluating suspected recurrence. CT provides optimal imaging of the spine and pelvis, frequently providing a clinically relevant supplement to bone scan or plain film information. In a study of eight patients with skeletal metastases from cervical carcinoma and three cases of radiation osteitis, overlap existed in their imaging characteristics. Metastases were always lytic but nearby sclerotic areas from radiation were often present. Radiation osteitis may be lytic, sclerotic, or mixed, and both may avidly accumulate bone-scanning radiotracers. The absence of a soft tissue mass, slow progression, blastic elements, and sharply defined borders on CT suggest radiation necrosis. However, in some lesions within a radiation portal, biopsy or MRI may be required for final diagnosis.

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