Transverse glabellar flap for obliteration/isolation of the nasofrontal duct from the anterior cranial base

Joseph J. Disa, Bradley C. Robertson, Stephen E. Metzinger, Paul N. Manson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Management of fractures involving the nasofrontal duct region of the frontal sinus has focused on preserving function when possible or obliterating the sinus and duct when fracture patterns potentiate ductal obstruction and possible transcranial seeding of bacteria. When frontal sinus preservation is in doubt, controversy surrounds the use of cranialization versus obliteration, and the method of obliteration. Perioperative and late postoperative infections are uncommon, but their occurrence jeopardizes an often complex reconstruction and can be life threatening. This paper describes the design and indications for a pedicled transverse glabellar muscle flap for obliteration of the nasofrontal duct, thereby isolating the anterior cranial base from the aerodigestive system. This vascularized muscle flap utilizes the corrugator supercilii and procerus muscles, which are introduced into the sinus via a small, surgically created window in the superomodial orbital wall without disturbing the central facial aesthetic contours. Six patients with comminuted fractures at the nasofrontal duct level associated with displaced posterior frontal sinus fractures have been treated with the transverse glabellar flap. Follow-up ranges from 8 to 30 months. There have been no early or late postoperative complications. The transverse glabellar flap is a reliable and versatile method of partitioning the upper aerodigestive tract from the anterior cranial base with vascularized tissue, thus minimizing the risk of infectious complications. The resulting donor site deformity is more acceptable than that seen with the traditional pedicled galeal frontalis flap.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)453-457
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of plastic surgery
Volume36
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Transverse glabellar flap for obliteration/isolation of the nasofrontal duct from the anterior cranial base'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this