Transplant professionals vary in the long-term medical risks they communicate to potential living kidney donors: An international survey

A. A. Housawi, A. Young, N. Boudville, H. Thiessen-Philbrook, N. Muirhead, F. Rehman, C. R. Parikh, A. Al-Obaidli, A. El-Triki, A. X. Garg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background. Discussing long-term medical risks with potential living donors is a vital aspect of informed consent. We considered whether there are global practice variations in the information communicated to potential living kidney donors. Methods. Transplant professionals participated in a survey to determine which long-term risks are communicated to potential living kidney donors. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed in person and by electronic mail. Results. We surveyed 203 practitioners from 119 cities in 35 different countries. Sixty-three percent of participants were nephrologists, and 27% were surgeons. Risks of hypertension, proteinuria or kidney failure requiring dialysis were frequently discussed (usually over 80% of practitioners discussed each medical condition). However, many practitioners do not believe these risks are increased after donation, with surgeons being less convinced of long-term sequelae compared with nephrologists (P < 0.01). About 30% of practitioners discuss long-term risks of premature cardiovascular disease or death with potential donors. Conclusions. Transplant professionals vary in the long-term risks they communicate to potential donors. Improving consensus will enhance decision-making, and emphasize best practices which maintain good, long-term donor health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3040-3045
Number of pages6
JournalNephrology Dialysis Transplantation
Volume22
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Consent
  • Donor nephrectomy
  • Living kidney donation
  • Long-term complications
  • Risk communication
  • Survey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology
  • Transplantation

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