Transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by transplantation: Clinical aspects and time course analysis of viral antigenemia and antibody production

P. A. Bowen, S. A. Lobel, R. J. Caruana, M. S. Leffell, M. A. House, J. P.A.L. Rissing Humphries

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was transmitted to a patient who received a cadaveric renal transplant from a donor who had received massive blood component replacement. A negative HIV antibody test was obtained on serum drawn immediately after transfusion. After transplantation, pretransfusion sera and sera obtained several hours after transfusion tested positive for HIV antibody, suggesting that transfusions had transiently diluted the patient's serum and resulted in a false-negative HIV antibody test. Immediately after transplantation, the recipient showed a transient increase in HIV antigen levels followed by a more sustained increase representing de-novo antigen synthesis. Antibodies to HIV were detected 51 days after transplant. The recipient has shown no signs of symptoms of HIV infection after 1 year. In potential cadaveric organ donors, HIV antibody testing should be performed on pretransfusion sera or on sera obtained several hours after massive transfusion of blood products.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-48
Number of pages3
JournalAnnals of internal medicine
Volume108
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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