Transmission of free-running and Q-switched erbium: YSGG laser radiation through sapphire and germanium fibers

Nathaniel M. Fried, Yubing Yang, Charles A. Chaney, Daniel Fried

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The Erbium: YAG (λ = 2.94 μm) and Erbium:YSGG (λ - 2.79 μm) lasers are currently being used for tissue ablation in several medical specialties, including dermatology, ophthalmology and dentistry. Some of these applications may benefit from the availability of an optical fiber capable of delivering sufficient short-pulse, Q-switched Erbium laser energy for precise and rapid ablation of hard and soft tissues. Fiber transmission studies were conducted using both free-running (300 μs) and Q-switched (500 ns) Er:YSGG laser pulses delivered at 3 Hz through 1-meter-long samples of 450-μm germanium oxide and 425-μm sapphire optical fibers. Fiber optic transmission of free-running Er:YSGG laser radiation averaged 76% and 88% for the germanium and sapphire fibers (n = 7), respectively. Transmission of Q-switched Er:YSGG laser radiation averaged 57% and 65% for the germanium and sapphire fibers (n = 7), respectively. Fiber optic transmission of Q-switched pulse energies as high as 42 mJ was achieved through the fibers. However, damage at the input ends of the fibers began to occur at input / output pulse energies above 40 mJ / 25 mJ (n = 2), respectively. Both germanium oxide and sapphire optical fibers are capable of transmitting sufficient free-running and Q-switched Er:YSGG laser radiation for hard and soft tissue ablation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
EditorsI. Gannot
Pages9-12
Number of pages4
Volume5317
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004
EventProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Optical Fibers and Sensors for Medical Applications IV - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 24 2004Jan 25 2004

Other

OtherProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Optical Fibers and Sensors for Medical Applications IV
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose, CA
Period1/24/041/25/04

Fingerprint

Erbium
Laser radiation
Germanium
Sapphire
erbium
germanium
sapphire
laser beams
Germanium oxides
Ablation
fibers
Fibers
germanium oxides
ablation
Optical fibers
optical fibers
Tissue
pulses
Fiber optics
Laser pulses

Keywords

  • Er:YAG
  • Er:YSGG
  • Erbium
  • Germanium oxide
  • Q-switched
  • Sapphire
  • Transmission

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Fried, N. M., Yang, Y., Chaney, C. A., & Fried, D. (2004). Transmission of free-running and Q-switched erbium: YSGG laser radiation through sapphire and germanium fibers. In I. Gannot (Ed.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 5317, pp. 9-12) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.526962

Transmission of free-running and Q-switched erbium : YSGG laser radiation through sapphire and germanium fibers. / Fried, Nathaniel M.; Yang, Yubing; Chaney, Charles A.; Fried, Daniel.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. ed. / I. Gannot. Vol. 5317 2004. p. 9-12.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Fried, NM, Yang, Y, Chaney, CA & Fried, D 2004, Transmission of free-running and Q-switched erbium: YSGG laser radiation through sapphire and germanium fibers. in I Gannot (ed.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 5317, pp. 9-12, Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Optical Fibers and Sensors for Medical Applications IV, San Jose, CA, United States, 1/24/04. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.526962
Fried NM, Yang Y, Chaney CA, Fried D. Transmission of free-running and Q-switched erbium: YSGG laser radiation through sapphire and germanium fibers. In Gannot I, editor, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 5317. 2004. p. 9-12 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.526962
Fried, Nathaniel M. ; Yang, Yubing ; Chaney, Charles A. ; Fried, Daniel. / Transmission of free-running and Q-switched erbium : YSGG laser radiation through sapphire and germanium fibers. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. editor / I. Gannot. Vol. 5317 2004. pp. 9-12
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abstract = "The Erbium: YAG (λ = 2.94 μm) and Erbium:YSGG (λ - 2.79 μm) lasers are currently being used for tissue ablation in several medical specialties, including dermatology, ophthalmology and dentistry. Some of these applications may benefit from the availability of an optical fiber capable of delivering sufficient short-pulse, Q-switched Erbium laser energy for precise and rapid ablation of hard and soft tissues. Fiber transmission studies were conducted using both free-running (300 μs) and Q-switched (500 ns) Er:YSGG laser pulses delivered at 3 Hz through 1-meter-long samples of 450-μm germanium oxide and 425-μm sapphire optical fibers. Fiber optic transmission of free-running Er:YSGG laser radiation averaged 76{\%} and 88{\%} for the germanium and sapphire fibers (n = 7), respectively. Transmission of Q-switched Er:YSGG laser radiation averaged 57{\%} and 65{\%} for the germanium and sapphire fibers (n = 7), respectively. Fiber optic transmission of Q-switched pulse energies as high as 42 mJ was achieved through the fibers. However, damage at the input ends of the fibers began to occur at input / output pulse energies above 40 mJ / 25 mJ (n = 2), respectively. Both germanium oxide and sapphire optical fibers are capable of transmitting sufficient free-running and Q-switched Er:YSGG laser radiation for hard and soft tissue ablation.",
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