Translational approaches to understanding metabolic dysfunction and cardiovascular consequences of obstructive sleep apnea

Luciano F. Drager, Vsevolod Polotsky, Christopher P. O’Donnell, Sergio L. Cravo, Geraldo Lorenzi-Filho, Benedito H. Machado

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is known to be independently associated with several cardiovascular diseases including hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. To determine how OSA can increase cardiovascular risk, animal models have been developed to explore the underlying mechanisms and the cellular and end-organ targets of the predominant pathophysiological disturbance in OSA–intermittent hypoxia. Despite several limitations in translating data from animal models to the clinical arena, significant progress has been made in our understanding of how OSA confers increased cardiovascular risk. It is clear now that the hypoxic stress associated with OSA can elicit a broad spectrum of pathological systemic events including sympathetic activation, systemic inflammation, impaired glucose and lipid metabolism, and endothelial dysfunction, among others. This review provides an update of the basic, clinical, and translational advances in our understanding of the metabolic dysfunction and cardiovascular consequences of OSA and highlights the most recent findings and perspectives in the field.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)H1101-H1111
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume309
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

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Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Animal Models
Lipid Metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases
Stroke
Myocardial Infarction
Hypertension
Inflammation
Glucose

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Intermittent hypoxia
  • Sleep apnea
  • Translational medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Translational approaches to understanding metabolic dysfunction and cardiovascular consequences of obstructive sleep apnea. / Drager, Luciano F.; Polotsky, Vsevolod; O’Donnell, Christopher P.; Cravo, Sergio L.; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Machado, Benedito H.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, Vol. 309, No. 7, 01.09.2015, p. H1101-H1111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Drager, Luciano F. ; Polotsky, Vsevolod ; O’Donnell, Christopher P. ; Cravo, Sergio L. ; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo ; Machado, Benedito H. / Translational approaches to understanding metabolic dysfunction and cardiovascular consequences of obstructive sleep apnea. In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology. 2015 ; Vol. 309, No. 7. pp. H1101-H1111.
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