Translating the brain-machine interface

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Brain-machine and brain-computer interface technologies hold great promise for use in the recovery of sensory and motor functions lost as a result of nervous-system injuries or limb amputations. This Perspective describes the current state of noninvasive and invasive technologies with a view to potential applications. The scientific and technological challenges and barriers to translation are critically analyzed for a variety of approaches.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number210ps17
JournalScience Translational Medicine
Volume5
Issue number210
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 6 2013

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Brain-Computer Interfaces
Technology
Nervous System Trauma
Amputation
Extremities
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Translating the brain-machine interface. / Thakor, Nitish V.

In: Science Translational Medicine, Vol. 5, No. 210, 210ps17, 06.11.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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