Translating Professional Obligations to Care for Patients with Ebola Virus Disease into Practice in Nonepidemic Settings

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Determining how clinicians should meet their professional obligations to treat patients with Ebola virus disease in nonepidemic settings necessitates considering measures to minimize risks to clinicians, the context of care, and fairness. Minimizing risks includes providing appropriate equipment and training, implementing strategies for reducing exposure to infectious material, identifying a small number of centers to provide care, and determining which risky procedures should be used when they pose minimal likelihood of appreciable clinical benefit. Factors associated with the clinical environment, such as the local prevalence of the disease, the nature of the setting, and the availability of effective treatment, are also relevant to obligations to treat. Fairness demands that the best possible medical care be provided for health care professionals who become infected and that the rights and interests of relevant stakeholders be addressed through policy-making processes. Going forward it will be essential to learn from current approaches and to modify them based on data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)527-530
Number of pages4
JournalDisaster medicine and public health preparedness
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 18 2015

Keywords

  • Ebola
  • duty to treat
  • ethics
  • health care professional

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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