Transgenic Mosquitoes Expressing a Phospholipase A2 Gene Have a Fitness Advantage When Fed Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Blood

Ryan C. Smith, Christopher Kizito, Jason L. Rasgon, Marcelo Jacobs-Lorena

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background:Genetically modified mosquitoes have been proposed as an alternative strategy to reduce the heavy burden of malaria. In recent years, several proof-of-principle experiments have been performed that validate the idea that mosquitoes can be genetically modified to become refractory to malaria parasite development.Results:We have created two transgenic lines of Anopheles stephensi, a natural vector of Plasmodium falciparum, which constitutively secrete a catalytically inactive phospholipase A2 (mPLA2) into the midgut lumen to interfere with Plasmodium ookinete invasion. Our experiments show that both transgenic lines expressing mPLA2 significantly impair the development of rodent malaria parasites, but only one line impairs the development of human malaria parasites. In addition, when fed on malaria-infected blood, mosquitoes from both transgenic lines are more fecund than non-transgenic mosquitoes. Consistent with these observations, cage experiments with mixed populations of transgenic and non-transgenic mosquitoes show that the percentage of transgenic mosquitoes increases when maintained on Plasmodium-infected blood.Conclusions:Our results suggest that the expression of an anti-Plasmodium effector gene gives transgenic mosquitoes a fitness advantage when fed malaria-infected blood. These findings have important implications for future applications of transgenic mosquito technology in malaria control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere76097
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013

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phospholipase A2
Phospholipases A2
Plasmodium falciparum
Culicidae
malaria
Blood
Malaria
Genes
genetically modified organisms
Malaria control
blood
Plasmodium
genes
Experiments
Refractory materials
Parasites
parasites
ookinetes
Anopheles stephensi
Anopheles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Transgenic Mosquitoes Expressing a Phospholipase A2 Gene Have a Fitness Advantage When Fed Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Blood. / Smith, Ryan C.; Kizito, Christopher; Rasgon, Jason L.; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 10, e76097, 01.10.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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