Transforming the Morbidity and Mortality Conference to Promote Safety and Quality in a PICU

Christina L. Cifra, Melania Bembea, James C Fackler, Marlene R. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Determine the effectiveness of a structured systems-oriented morbidity and mortality conference in improving the process of reviewing and responding to adverse events in a PICU. Design: Prospective time series analysis before and after implementation of a systems-oriented morbidity and mortality conference. Setting: Single tertiary referral PICU in Baltimore, MD. Patients: Thirty-three patients discussed before and 31 patients after implementation of a systems-oriented morbidity and mortality conference over a total of 20 morbidity and mortality conferences, from April 2013 to March 2014. Interventions: Systems-oriented morbidity and mortality conference incorporating elements of medical incident analysis. Measurements and Main Results: There was a significant increase in meeting attendance (mean, 12 vs 31 attendees per morbidity and mortality conference; p <0.001) after the systems-oriented morbidity and mortality conference was instituted. There was no significant difference in the mean number of cases suggested (4.2 vs 4.6) or discussed (3.3 vs 3.1) per morbidity and mortality conference. There was also no significant difference in the mean number of adverse events identified per morbidity and mortality conference (3.4 vs 4.3). However, there was an increase in the proportion of cases discussed using a standard case review tool, but this did not reach statistical significance (27% vs 45%; p = 0.231). Nevertheless, we observed a significant increase in the mean number of quality improvement interventions suggested (2.4 vs 5.6; p <0.001) and implemented (1.7 vs 4.4; p <0.001) per morbidity and mortality conference. All adverse event categories identified had corresponding interventions suggested after the systems-oriented morbidity and mortality conference was instituted compared with before (80% vs 100%). Intervention-to-adverse event ratios per category were also higher (mean, 0.6 vs 1.5). Conclusions: A structured systems-oriented PICU morbidity and mortality conference incorporating elements of medical incident analysis improves the process of reviewing and responding to adverse events by significantly increasing quality improvement interventions suggested and implemented. Future work would involve testing locally adapted versions of the systems-oriented morbidity and mortality conference in multiple inpatient settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)58-66
Number of pages9
JournalPediatric Critical Care Medicine
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Morbidity
Safety
Mortality
Quality Improvement
Baltimore
Inpatients
Referral and Consultation

Keywords

  • medical errors
  • patient care team
  • patient safety
  • pediatric intensive care unit
  • quality improvement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Transforming the Morbidity and Mortality Conference to Promote Safety and Quality in a PICU. / Cifra, Christina L.; Bembea, Melania; Fackler, James C; Miller, Marlene R.

In: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 17, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. 58-66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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