Transfer of training in the development of intracorporeal suturing skill in medical student novices: A prospective randomized trial

Claude Muresan, Tommy H. Lee, Jacob Seagull, Adrian E. Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: To help optimize the use of limited resources in trainee education, we developed a prospective randomized trial to determine the most effective means of teaching laparoscopic suturing to novices. Methods: Forty-one medical students received rudimentary instruction in intracorporeal suturing, then were pretested on a pig enterotomy model. They then were posttested after completion of 1 of 4 training arms: laparoscopic suturing, laparoscopic drills, open suturing, and virtual reality (VR) drills. Tests were scored for speed, accuracy, knot quality, and mental workload (National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA] Task Load Index). Results: Paired t tests were used. Task time was improved in all groups except the VR group. Knot quality improved only in the open or laparoscopic suturing groups. Mental workload improved only for those practicing on a physical laparoscopic trainer. Conclusions: For novice trainees, the efficacy of VR training is questionable. In contrast, the other training methods had benefits in terms of time, quality, and perceived workload.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)537-541
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican journal of surgery
Volume200
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Laparoscopic suturing
  • Skills transfer
  • Surgical training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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