Transfer of HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes to an AIDS patient leads to selection for mutant HIV variants and subsequent disease progression

S. Koenig, A. J. Conley, Y. A. Brewah, G. M. Jones, S. Leath, L. J. Boots, V. Davey, G. Pantaleo, J. F. Demarest, C. Carter, C. Wannebo, J. R. Yannelli, S. A. Rosenberg, H. C. Lane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

An HIV-1-seropositive volunteer was infused with an expanded autologous cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clone directed against the HIV-1 nef protein. This clone was adoptively transferred to determine whether supplementing CTL activity cold reduce viral load or improve clinical course. Unexpectedly, infusion was followed by a decline in circulating CD4+ T cells and a rise in viral load. Some of the HIV isolates obtained from the plasma or CD4+ cells of the patient were lacking the nef epitope. These results suggest that active CTL selection of viral variants could contribute to the pathogenesis of AIDS and that clinical progression can occur despite high levels of circulating HIV-1-specific CTLs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)330-336
Number of pages7
JournalNature Medicine
Volume1
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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T-cells
Cytotoxic T-Lymphocytes
Disease Progression
HIV-1
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
HIV
Viral Load
Clone Cells
Epitopes
Volunteers
T-Lymphocytes
Cells
Plasmas

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Koenig, S., Conley, A. J., Brewah, Y. A., Jones, G. M., Leath, S., Boots, L. J., ... Lane, H. C. (1995). Transfer of HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes to an AIDS patient leads to selection for mutant HIV variants and subsequent disease progression. Nature Medicine, 1(4), 330-336.

Transfer of HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes to an AIDS patient leads to selection for mutant HIV variants and subsequent disease progression. / Koenig, S.; Conley, A. J.; Brewah, Y. A.; Jones, G. M.; Leath, S.; Boots, L. J.; Davey, V.; Pantaleo, G.; Demarest, J. F.; Carter, C.; Wannebo, C.; Yannelli, J. R.; Rosenberg, S. A.; Lane, H. C.

In: Nature Medicine, Vol. 1, No. 4, 1995, p. 330-336.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Koenig, S, Conley, AJ, Brewah, YA, Jones, GM, Leath, S, Boots, LJ, Davey, V, Pantaleo, G, Demarest, JF, Carter, C, Wannebo, C, Yannelli, JR, Rosenberg, SA & Lane, HC 1995, 'Transfer of HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes to an AIDS patient leads to selection for mutant HIV variants and subsequent disease progression', Nature Medicine, vol. 1, no. 4, pp. 330-336.
Koenig, S. ; Conley, A. J. ; Brewah, Y. A. ; Jones, G. M. ; Leath, S. ; Boots, L. J. ; Davey, V. ; Pantaleo, G. ; Demarest, J. F. ; Carter, C. ; Wannebo, C. ; Yannelli, J. R. ; Rosenberg, S. A. ; Lane, H. C. / Transfer of HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes to an AIDS patient leads to selection for mutant HIV variants and subsequent disease progression. In: Nature Medicine. 1995 ; Vol. 1, No. 4. pp. 330-336.
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