Transbronchial needle aspiration in the diagnosis and staging of bronchogenic carcinoma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Lung cancer often requires an invasive surgical procedure to document inoperability. Using a fiberoptic bronchoscope with a flexible needle that can penetrate the walls of the trachea and major bronchi, we sampled mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes in 32 patients. Of 18 patients presenting with a diagnostic problem, 11 had aspirates that were positive for cancer. Surgery in 6 of the remaining 7 showed cancer in 4 (false negative). Ten other patients presented with a staging problem. Four had positive mediastinal aspirates; 3 of these 4 had a normal or equivocally normal mediastinum on chest roentgenogram. Surgery in 4 of the remaining 6 showed no cancer in 4 (true negatives). The procedure was also diagnostic in 2 of 4 patients with recurrent mediastinal small cell carcinoma and in 3 patients with intrabronchial necrotic tumors. There were no complications. We conclude that this is a safe, easily performed procedure that can replace more invasive procedures in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)344-347
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Review of Respiratory Disease
Volume127
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1983

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Bronchogenic Carcinoma
Needles
Lung Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Bronchoscopes
Small Cell Carcinoma
Mediastinum
Bronchi
Trachea
Thorax
Lymph Nodes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Transbronchial needle aspiration in the diagnosis and staging of bronchogenic carcinoma",
abstract = "Lung cancer often requires an invasive surgical procedure to document inoperability. Using a fiberoptic bronchoscope with a flexible needle that can penetrate the walls of the trachea and major bronchi, we sampled mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes in 32 patients. Of 18 patients presenting with a diagnostic problem, 11 had aspirates that were positive for cancer. Surgery in 6 of the remaining 7 showed cancer in 4 (false negative). Ten other patients presented with a staging problem. Four had positive mediastinal aspirates; 3 of these 4 had a normal or equivocally normal mediastinum on chest roentgenogram. Surgery in 4 of the remaining 6 showed no cancer in 4 (true negatives). The procedure was also diagnostic in 2 of 4 patients with recurrent mediastinal small cell carcinoma and in 3 patients with intrabronchial necrotic tumors. There were no complications. We conclude that this is a safe, easily performed procedure that can replace more invasive procedures in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer.",
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N2 - Lung cancer often requires an invasive surgical procedure to document inoperability. Using a fiberoptic bronchoscope with a flexible needle that can penetrate the walls of the trachea and major bronchi, we sampled mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes in 32 patients. Of 18 patients presenting with a diagnostic problem, 11 had aspirates that were positive for cancer. Surgery in 6 of the remaining 7 showed cancer in 4 (false negative). Ten other patients presented with a staging problem. Four had positive mediastinal aspirates; 3 of these 4 had a normal or equivocally normal mediastinum on chest roentgenogram. Surgery in 4 of the remaining 6 showed no cancer in 4 (true negatives). The procedure was also diagnostic in 2 of 4 patients with recurrent mediastinal small cell carcinoma and in 3 patients with intrabronchial necrotic tumors. There were no complications. We conclude that this is a safe, easily performed procedure that can replace more invasive procedures in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer.

AB - Lung cancer often requires an invasive surgical procedure to document inoperability. Using a fiberoptic bronchoscope with a flexible needle that can penetrate the walls of the trachea and major bronchi, we sampled mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes in 32 patients. Of 18 patients presenting with a diagnostic problem, 11 had aspirates that were positive for cancer. Surgery in 6 of the remaining 7 showed cancer in 4 (false negative). Ten other patients presented with a staging problem. Four had positive mediastinal aspirates; 3 of these 4 had a normal or equivocally normal mediastinum on chest roentgenogram. Surgery in 4 of the remaining 6 showed no cancer in 4 (true negatives). The procedure was also diagnostic in 2 of 4 patients with recurrent mediastinal small cell carcinoma and in 3 patients with intrabronchial necrotic tumors. There were no complications. We conclude that this is a safe, easily performed procedure that can replace more invasive procedures in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer.

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