Training on mind-body skills: Feasibility and effects on physician mindfulness, compassion, and associated effects on stress, burnout, and clinical outcomes

Michelle C. Nguyen, Steven G. Gabbe, Kathi J. Kemper, John D. Mahan, Jennifer S. Cheavens, Susan D. Moffatt-Bruce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examines the feasibility and effectiveness of a Mind-Body Skills training (MBST) curriculum in promoting physician compassion and mindfulness, and reducing stress and burnout. Participants were offered up to 7 hours of training: four free online modules on MBST and three interactive discussion sessions. Primary outcomes included feasibility and improvements in mindfulness and compassion. Of the 66 participants, 50 (76%) completed pre- and post-intervention questionnaires. Most (62%) completed at least one of seven hours of training. Compared with participants who used zero hours of training, those who completed at least one hour of training had significant mean differences in compassion (p = 0.05), burnout (p = 0.05), and emotional exhaustion (p < 0.01). These findings suggest that even brief Mind-Body Skills training curriculum for physicians is feasible, and is observed to be associated with improvements in compassion and reductions in burnout.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Positive Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • medical education
  • Mind-body skills training
  • physician burnout
  • physician stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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