Training in community pediatrics: A national survey of program directors

Barry Solomon, Cynthia S Minkovitz, Jennifer E. Mettrick, Carol Carraccio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective. - To describe the spectrum of residency training in community-based settings, assess the extent of resident education on community pediatrics topics, and determine whether educational activities vary by program size or availability of primary care tracks. Methods. - Survey of US pediatric residency program directors from May-September 2002. A 10-ite self-administered questionnaire assessed the programs' extent of resident involvement in 15 selected community-based settings and inclusion of didactic or practical education regarding 13 community health topics. Results. - Of 168 programs surveyed (81% response rate), 40% were small (≤30 residents), 35% were medium (31-50 residents), 25% were large (>50 residents), and 15% had primary care tracks. Frequently required community-based settings included schools (69%), child protection teams (62%), day care centers (57%), and home visiting (48%). Of 15 community-based settings, 28% required involvement in fewer than 4, 41% required involvement in 4-6, and 31% required involvement in 7 or more. More than two-thirds offered didactic teaching and practical experience on issues related to managed care, cultural competency, and the mental health and social service systems. There were no differences in the number of required community-based settings by program size or presence of primary care tracks. Conclusions. - Most pediatric residency programs require exposure to community-based settings and provide education on various community health topics. Ongoing challenges include continued implementation amid work duty hour limitations, best practice models for practical implementation of community-based experience into residency training, and the impact of such training on future involvement in the community and physician practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)476-481
Number of pages6
JournalAmbulatory Pediatrics
Volume4
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2004

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Pediatrics
Internship and Residency
Education
Primary Health Care
Surveys and Questionnaires
Cultural Competency
Health
Mental Health Services
Managed Care Programs
Social Work
Practice Guidelines
Teaching
Physicians

Keywords

  • Community pediatrics
  • Educational competencies
  • Residency training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Training in community pediatrics : A national survey of program directors. / Solomon, Barry; Minkovitz, Cynthia S; Mettrick, Jennifer E.; Carraccio, Carol.

In: Ambulatory Pediatrics, Vol. 4, No. 6, 11.2004, p. 476-481.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Solomon, Barry ; Minkovitz, Cynthia S ; Mettrick, Jennifer E. ; Carraccio, Carol. / Training in community pediatrics : A national survey of program directors. In: Ambulatory Pediatrics. 2004 ; Vol. 4, No. 6. pp. 476-481.
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