Toxicity and management in CAR T-cell therapy

Challice Bonifant, Hollie J. Jackson, Renier J. Brentjens, Kevin J. Curran

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

T cells can be genetically modified to target tumors through the expression of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). Most notably, CAR T cells have demonstrated clinical efficacy in hematologic malignancies with more modest responses when targeting solid tumors. However, CAR T cells also have the capacity to elicit expected and unexpected toxicities including: cytokine release syndrome, neurologic toxicity, "on target/off tumor" recognition, and anaphylaxis. Theoretical toxicities including clonal expansion secondary to insertional oncogenesis, graft versus host disease, and off-target antigen recognition have not been clinically evident. Abrogating toxicity has become a critical step in the successful application of this emerging technology. To this end, we review the reported and theoretical toxicities of CAR T cells and their management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number16011
Number of pages1
JournalMolecular Therapy - Oncolytics
Volume3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 20 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Antigen Receptors
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
Neoplasms
Anaphylaxis
Graft vs Host Disease
Hematologic Neoplasms
Nervous System
Carcinogenesis
Cytokines
Technology
T-Lymphocytes
Antigens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Toxicity and management in CAR T-cell therapy. / Bonifant, Challice; Jackson, Hollie J.; Brentjens, Renier J.; Curran, Kevin J.

In: Molecular Therapy - Oncolytics, Vol. 3, 16011, 20.04.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Bonifant, Challice ; Jackson, Hollie J. ; Brentjens, Renier J. ; Curran, Kevin J. / Toxicity and management in CAR T-cell therapy. In: Molecular Therapy - Oncolytics. 2016 ; Vol. 3.
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