Toward a Sequential Strategy for Diagnosing Neurocognitive Disorders: A Consensus from the "Act On Dementia" European Joint Action

Pierre Krolak-Salmon, Audrey Maillet, Nicola Vanacore, Geir Selbaek, Konrad Rejdak, Latchezar Traykov, Antonios Politis, Jean Georges, Soo Borson, Armelle Leperre-Desplanques

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Neurocognitive disorders causing progressive cognitive, functional, and behavioral impairment remain underdiagnosed. The needs for a timely diagnosis are now widely acknowledged since person-centered care helps to preserve life quality and prevent crises. One powerful barrier to detection in primary care is the lack of an easy-to-follow stepwise approach, grounded in evidence and consistent with high-quality specialty practice. To help fill this gap, the current European Joint Action proposes a graduated diagnosis strategy tailored to the patients' needs and wills, clarifying appropriate components for primary and specialty care. This strategy considers a first evaluation in primary care that may detect a neurocognitive disorder, that would lead to a second evaluation step allowing etiological diagnosis hypotheses performed mostly by the specialist. A third evaluation stage considering some biological, electrophysiological, or neuroimaging complementary techniques would be proposed to atypical cases or patients willing to consider access to research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)363-372
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD
Volume72
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • detection
  • diagnosis
  • general practitioner
  • memory
  • neurocognitive disorder

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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