Toward a functional analysis of self-injury.

B. A. Iwata, M. F. Dorsey, Keith John Slifer, K. E. Bauman, G. S. Richman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study describes the use of an operant methodology to assess functional relationships between self-injury and specific environmental events. The self-injurious behaviors of nine developmentally disabled subjects were observed during periods of brief, repeated exposure to a series of analogue conditions. Each condition differed along one or more of the following dimensions: (1) play materials (present vs absent), (2) experimenter demands (high vs low), and (3) social attention (absent vs noncontingent vs contingent). Results showed a great deal of both between and within-subject variability. However, in six of the nine subjects, higher levels of self-injury were consistently associated with a specific stimulus condition, suggesting that within-subject variability was a function of distinct features of the social and/or physical environment. These data are discussed in light of previously suggested hypotheses for the motivation of self-injury, with particular emphasis on their implications for the selection of suitable treatments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)197-209
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Applied Behavior Analysis
Volume27
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 1994

Fingerprint

functional analysis
Wounds and Injuries
Self-Injurious Behavior
Motivation
stimulus
Self-injury
Functional Analysis
event
present
methodology
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Iwata, B. A., Dorsey, M. F., Slifer, K. J., Bauman, K. E., & Richman, G. S. (1994). Toward a functional analysis of self-injury. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 27(2), 197-209.

Toward a functional analysis of self-injury. / Iwata, B. A.; Dorsey, M. F.; Slifer, Keith John; Bauman, K. E.; Richman, G. S.

In: Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Vol. 27, No. 2, 06.1994, p. 197-209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Iwata, BA, Dorsey, MF, Slifer, KJ, Bauman, KE & Richman, GS 1994, 'Toward a functional analysis of self-injury.', Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 197-209.
Iwata BA, Dorsey MF, Slifer KJ, Bauman KE, Richman GS. Toward a functional analysis of self-injury. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. 1994 Jun;27(2):197-209.
Iwata, B. A. ; Dorsey, M. F. ; Slifer, Keith John ; Bauman, K. E. ; Richman, G. S. / Toward a functional analysis of self-injury. In: Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. 1994 ; Vol. 27, No. 2. pp. 197-209.
@article{e6ae0f2479ab4c0d8bc9686f8ac06295,
title = "Toward a functional analysis of self-injury.",
abstract = "This study describes the use of an operant methodology to assess functional relationships between self-injury and specific environmental events. The self-injurious behaviors of nine developmentally disabled subjects were observed during periods of brief, repeated exposure to a series of analogue conditions. Each condition differed along one or more of the following dimensions: (1) play materials (present vs absent), (2) experimenter demands (high vs low), and (3) social attention (absent vs noncontingent vs contingent). Results showed a great deal of both between and within-subject variability. However, in six of the nine subjects, higher levels of self-injury were consistently associated with a specific stimulus condition, suggesting that within-subject variability was a function of distinct features of the social and/or physical environment. These data are discussed in light of previously suggested hypotheses for the motivation of self-injury, with particular emphasis on their implications for the selection of suitable treatments.",
author = "Iwata, {B. A.} and Dorsey, {M. F.} and Slifer, {Keith John} and Bauman, {K. E.} and Richman, {G. S.}",
year = "1994",
month = "6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "27",
pages = "197--209",
journal = "Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis",
issn = "0021-8855",
publisher = "Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Toward a functional analysis of self-injury.

AU - Iwata, B. A.

AU - Dorsey, M. F.

AU - Slifer, Keith John

AU - Bauman, K. E.

AU - Richman, G. S.

PY - 1994/6

Y1 - 1994/6

N2 - This study describes the use of an operant methodology to assess functional relationships between self-injury and specific environmental events. The self-injurious behaviors of nine developmentally disabled subjects were observed during periods of brief, repeated exposure to a series of analogue conditions. Each condition differed along one or more of the following dimensions: (1) play materials (present vs absent), (2) experimenter demands (high vs low), and (3) social attention (absent vs noncontingent vs contingent). Results showed a great deal of both between and within-subject variability. However, in six of the nine subjects, higher levels of self-injury were consistently associated with a specific stimulus condition, suggesting that within-subject variability was a function of distinct features of the social and/or physical environment. These data are discussed in light of previously suggested hypotheses for the motivation of self-injury, with particular emphasis on their implications for the selection of suitable treatments.

AB - This study describes the use of an operant methodology to assess functional relationships between self-injury and specific environmental events. The self-injurious behaviors of nine developmentally disabled subjects were observed during periods of brief, repeated exposure to a series of analogue conditions. Each condition differed along one or more of the following dimensions: (1) play materials (present vs absent), (2) experimenter demands (high vs low), and (3) social attention (absent vs noncontingent vs contingent). Results showed a great deal of both between and within-subject variability. However, in six of the nine subjects, higher levels of self-injury were consistently associated with a specific stimulus condition, suggesting that within-subject variability was a function of distinct features of the social and/or physical environment. These data are discussed in light of previously suggested hypotheses for the motivation of self-injury, with particular emphasis on their implications for the selection of suitable treatments.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028453954&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028453954&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8063622

AN - SCOPUS:0028453954

VL - 27

SP - 197

EP - 209

JO - Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis

JF - Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis

SN - 0021-8855

IS - 2

ER -