Total tooth loss and prevalent cardiovascular disease in men and women: Possible roles of citrus fruit consumption, vitamin C, and inflammatory and thrombotic variables

Gordon Lowe, Mark Woodward, Ann Rumley, Caroline Morrison, Hugh Tunstall-Pedoe, Kenneth Stephen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background and Objective: Tooth loss has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), but the mechanisms are unclear. We evaluated the association of total tooth loss with prevalent CVD in men and women; as well as with citrus fruit consumption, plasma vitamin C, and inflammatory and thrombotic variables. Methods: We used an age-and sex-stratified population survey, of men and women aged 25-74 years, in North Glasgow. Results: Thirty-eight percent of women and 29% of men were edentulous. Total tooth loss was associated with prevalent CVD in both sexes. After adjustment for major potential confounders (age, sex, smoking, and social class), the odds ratio (95% CI) for prevalent CVD was 1.55 (1.13, 2.13) in the edentulous. Total tooth loss was also associated with low citrus fruit consumption and low plasma vitamin C levels, increased plasma C-reactive protein in men, and with increased plasma interleukin-6, fibrinogen, and factor VIII levels in women. Conclusion: Prevalent CVD is associated with total tooth loss. Possible mechanisms include low intake of citrus fruit, and hence, low plasma vitamin C levels, and a predisposition to low-grade inflammation and thrombosis. It may be prudent to ensure adequate vitamin C intake in people with no teeth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)694-700
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume56
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2003

Keywords

  • Coronary heart disease
  • Dental disease
  • Inflammation
  • Vitamin C

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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