Total cholesterol and cancer risk in a large prospective study in Korea

Cari M. Kitahara, Amy Berrington De González, Neal D. Freedman, Rachel Huxley, Ye Jin Mok, Sun Ha Jee, Jonathan M. Samet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose To further clarify the relationship between total cholesterol and cancer, which remains unclear. Methods We prospectively examined the association between total cholesterol and site-specific and all-cancer incidence among 1,189,719 Korean adults enrolled in the National Health Insurance Corporation who underwent a standardized biennial medical examination in 1992 to 1995 and were observed for 14 years until cancer diagnosis or death. Results Over follow-up, 53,944 men and 24,475 women were diagnosed with a primary cancer. Compared with levels less than 160 mg/dL, high total cholesterol (≥ 240 mg/dL) was positively associated with prostate cancer (hazard ratio [HR], 1.24; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.44; P trend = .001) and colon cancer (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.25; P trend = .05) in men and breast cancer in women (HR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.33; P trend = .03). Higher total cholesterol was associated with a lower incidence of liver cancer (men: HR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.38 to 0.45; P trend < .001; women: HR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.27 to 0.39; P trend < .001), stomach cancer (men: HR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.82 to 0.93; P trend le; .001; women: HR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.97; P trend = .06), and, in men, lung cancer (HR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.82 to 0.96; P trend = .001). Results for liver cancer were slightly attenuated after additional adjustment for liver enzyme levels and hepatitis B surface antigen status (men: HR, 0.60; P trend < .001; women: HR, 0.46; P trend = .003) and exclusion of the first 10 years of follow-up (men: HR, 0.59; P trend = .001; women: HR, 0.44; P trend < .001). Total cholesterol was inversely associated with all-cancer incidence in both men (HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.81 to 0.86; P trend < .001) and women (HR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.87 to 0.95; P trend < .001), but these associations were attenuated after excluding incident liver cancers (men: HR, 0.95; P trend < .001; women: HR, 0.98; P trend = .32). Conclusion In this large prospective study, we found that total cholesterol was associated with the risk of several different cancers, although these relationships differed markedly by cancer site.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1592-1598
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume29
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 20 2011

Fingerprint

Korea
Cholesterol
Prospective Studies
Neoplasms
Liver Neoplasms
Incidence
National Health Programs
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens
Colonic Neoplasms
Stomach Neoplasms
Lung Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
Breast Neoplasms
Liver
Enzymes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Kitahara, C. M., De González, A. B., Freedman, N. D., Huxley, R., Mok, Y. J., Jee, S. H., & Samet, J. M. (2011). Total cholesterol and cancer risk in a large prospective study in Korea. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 29(12), 1592-1598. https://doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2010.31.5200

Total cholesterol and cancer risk in a large prospective study in Korea. / Kitahara, Cari M.; De González, Amy Berrington; Freedman, Neal D.; Huxley, Rachel; Mok, Ye Jin; Jee, Sun Ha; Samet, Jonathan M.

In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 29, No. 12, 20.04.2011, p. 1592-1598.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kitahara, CM, De González, AB, Freedman, ND, Huxley, R, Mok, YJ, Jee, SH & Samet, JM 2011, 'Total cholesterol and cancer risk in a large prospective study in Korea', Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 29, no. 12, pp. 1592-1598. https://doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2010.31.5200
Kitahara CM, De González AB, Freedman ND, Huxley R, Mok YJ, Jee SH et al. Total cholesterol and cancer risk in a large prospective study in Korea. Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2011 Apr 20;29(12):1592-1598. https://doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2010.31.5200
Kitahara, Cari M. ; De González, Amy Berrington ; Freedman, Neal D. ; Huxley, Rachel ; Mok, Ye Jin ; Jee, Sun Ha ; Samet, Jonathan M. / Total cholesterol and cancer risk in a large prospective study in Korea. In: Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2011 ; Vol. 29, No. 12. pp. 1592-1598.
@article{bc92040ffe9941ea86965cd9948623a6,
title = "Total cholesterol and cancer risk in a large prospective study in Korea",
abstract = "Purpose To further clarify the relationship between total cholesterol and cancer, which remains unclear. Methods We prospectively examined the association between total cholesterol and site-specific and all-cancer incidence among 1,189,719 Korean adults enrolled in the National Health Insurance Corporation who underwent a standardized biennial medical examination in 1992 to 1995 and were observed for 14 years until cancer diagnosis or death. Results Over follow-up, 53,944 men and 24,475 women were diagnosed with a primary cancer. Compared with levels less than 160 mg/dL, high total cholesterol (≥ 240 mg/dL) was positively associated with prostate cancer (hazard ratio [HR], 1.24; 95{\%} CI, 1.07 to 1.44; P trend = .001) and colon cancer (HR, 1.12; 95{\%} CI, 1.00 to 1.25; P trend = .05) in men and breast cancer in women (HR, 1.17; 95{\%} CI, 1.03 to 1.33; P trend = .03). Higher total cholesterol was associated with a lower incidence of liver cancer (men: HR, 0.42; 95{\%} CI, 0.38 to 0.45; P trend < .001; women: HR, 0.32; 95{\%} CI, 0.27 to 0.39; P trend < .001), stomach cancer (men: HR, 0.87; 95{\%} CI, 0.82 to 0.93; P trend le; .001; women: HR, 0.86; 95{\%} CI, 0.77 to 0.97; P trend = .06), and, in men, lung cancer (HR, 0.89; 95{\%} CI, 0.82 to 0.96; P trend = .001). Results for liver cancer were slightly attenuated after additional adjustment for liver enzyme levels and hepatitis B surface antigen status (men: HR, 0.60; P trend < .001; women: HR, 0.46; P trend = .003) and exclusion of the first 10 years of follow-up (men: HR, 0.59; P trend = .001; women: HR, 0.44; P trend < .001). Total cholesterol was inversely associated with all-cancer incidence in both men (HR, 0.84; 95{\%} CI, 0.81 to 0.86; P trend < .001) and women (HR, 0.91; 95{\%} CI, 0.87 to 0.95; P trend < .001), but these associations were attenuated after excluding incident liver cancers (men: HR, 0.95; P trend < .001; women: HR, 0.98; P trend = .32). Conclusion In this large prospective study, we found that total cholesterol was associated with the risk of several different cancers, although these relationships differed markedly by cancer site.",
author = "Kitahara, {Cari M.} and {De Gonz{\'a}lez}, {Amy Berrington} and Freedman, {Neal D.} and Rachel Huxley and Mok, {Ye Jin} and Jee, {Sun Ha} and Samet, {Jonathan M.}",
year = "2011",
month = "4",
day = "20",
doi = "10.1200/JCO.2010.31.5200",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
pages = "1592--1598",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Oncology",
issn = "0732-183X",
publisher = "American Society of Clinical Oncology",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Total cholesterol and cancer risk in a large prospective study in Korea

AU - Kitahara, Cari M.

AU - De González, Amy Berrington

AU - Freedman, Neal D.

AU - Huxley, Rachel

AU - Mok, Ye Jin

AU - Jee, Sun Ha

AU - Samet, Jonathan M.

PY - 2011/4/20

Y1 - 2011/4/20

N2 - Purpose To further clarify the relationship between total cholesterol and cancer, which remains unclear. Methods We prospectively examined the association between total cholesterol and site-specific and all-cancer incidence among 1,189,719 Korean adults enrolled in the National Health Insurance Corporation who underwent a standardized biennial medical examination in 1992 to 1995 and were observed for 14 years until cancer diagnosis or death. Results Over follow-up, 53,944 men and 24,475 women were diagnosed with a primary cancer. Compared with levels less than 160 mg/dL, high total cholesterol (≥ 240 mg/dL) was positively associated with prostate cancer (hazard ratio [HR], 1.24; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.44; P trend = .001) and colon cancer (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.25; P trend = .05) in men and breast cancer in women (HR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.33; P trend = .03). Higher total cholesterol was associated with a lower incidence of liver cancer (men: HR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.38 to 0.45; P trend < .001; women: HR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.27 to 0.39; P trend < .001), stomach cancer (men: HR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.82 to 0.93; P trend le; .001; women: HR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.97; P trend = .06), and, in men, lung cancer (HR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.82 to 0.96; P trend = .001). Results for liver cancer were slightly attenuated after additional adjustment for liver enzyme levels and hepatitis B surface antigen status (men: HR, 0.60; P trend < .001; women: HR, 0.46; P trend = .003) and exclusion of the first 10 years of follow-up (men: HR, 0.59; P trend = .001; women: HR, 0.44; P trend < .001). Total cholesterol was inversely associated with all-cancer incidence in both men (HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.81 to 0.86; P trend < .001) and women (HR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.87 to 0.95; P trend < .001), but these associations were attenuated after excluding incident liver cancers (men: HR, 0.95; P trend < .001; women: HR, 0.98; P trend = .32). Conclusion In this large prospective study, we found that total cholesterol was associated with the risk of several different cancers, although these relationships differed markedly by cancer site.

AB - Purpose To further clarify the relationship between total cholesterol and cancer, which remains unclear. Methods We prospectively examined the association between total cholesterol and site-specific and all-cancer incidence among 1,189,719 Korean adults enrolled in the National Health Insurance Corporation who underwent a standardized biennial medical examination in 1992 to 1995 and were observed for 14 years until cancer diagnosis or death. Results Over follow-up, 53,944 men and 24,475 women were diagnosed with a primary cancer. Compared with levels less than 160 mg/dL, high total cholesterol (≥ 240 mg/dL) was positively associated with prostate cancer (hazard ratio [HR], 1.24; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.44; P trend = .001) and colon cancer (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.25; P trend = .05) in men and breast cancer in women (HR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.33; P trend = .03). Higher total cholesterol was associated with a lower incidence of liver cancer (men: HR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.38 to 0.45; P trend < .001; women: HR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.27 to 0.39; P trend < .001), stomach cancer (men: HR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.82 to 0.93; P trend le; .001; women: HR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.97; P trend = .06), and, in men, lung cancer (HR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.82 to 0.96; P trend = .001). Results for liver cancer were slightly attenuated after additional adjustment for liver enzyme levels and hepatitis B surface antigen status (men: HR, 0.60; P trend < .001; women: HR, 0.46; P trend = .003) and exclusion of the first 10 years of follow-up (men: HR, 0.59; P trend = .001; women: HR, 0.44; P trend < .001). Total cholesterol was inversely associated with all-cancer incidence in both men (HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.81 to 0.86; P trend < .001) and women (HR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.87 to 0.95; P trend < .001), but these associations were attenuated after excluding incident liver cancers (men: HR, 0.95; P trend < .001; women: HR, 0.98; P trend = .32). Conclusion In this large prospective study, we found that total cholesterol was associated with the risk of several different cancers, although these relationships differed markedly by cancer site.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79955040537&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79955040537&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1200/JCO.2010.31.5200

DO - 10.1200/JCO.2010.31.5200

M3 - Article

C2 - 21422422

AN - SCOPUS:79955040537

VL - 29

SP - 1592

EP - 1598

JO - Journal of Clinical Oncology

JF - Journal of Clinical Oncology

SN - 0732-183X

IS - 12

ER -