Tomographic renal cortical scintigraphy: Correlation with intravenous urography, computed tomography, ultrasonography, angiography, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

David A. Schultz, Brahm Shapiro, Marco Amendola, Craig Sherman, Richard L. Wahl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study evaluates single-photon renal tomoscintigraphy (SPECT) in the evaluation of renal masses and correlates this modality, where indicated, with computed tomography (CT), ultrasonography (US), angiography (ANGIO) and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR). Eight patients with renal cortical lesions detected on intravenous urography (IVP) were evaluated by SPECT and planar nuclear imaging using Tc-99m glucoheptonate (GH). Three of these patients were felt particularly likely to have renal tumors and were additionally evaluated with US, CT, ANGIO and NMR. The five patients with nodules on IVP that were not particularly suggestive of malignancy had functioning, benign, renal tissue accounting for their IVP lesions. Four of five were found by planar-GH nuclear imaging, five/five by SPECT-GH. In addition, SPECT-GH allowed better "confidence" in the normal renal tissue diagnosis in three/five cases. Of the three renal lesions that were highly suggestive of malignancy, two were hypernephromas and one was hypertrophied functioning cortical tissue. All three were correctly identified prospectively on SPECT-GH; however, one hypernephroma was missed on planar-GH. NMR, CT, and ANGIO detected only one of two hypernephromas prospectively (US detected both); all four modalities incorrectly diagnosed the hypertrophied tissue suggestive of malignancy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)217-220
Number of pages4
JournalEuropean Journal of Nuclear Medicine
Volume11
Issue number6-7
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1985

Keywords

  • Columns of Bertin
  • Hypernephromas
  • Renal cortex imaging
  • Renal tumors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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