Tofu consumption and blood lead levels in young Chinese adults

Changzhong Chen, Xiaobin Wang, Dafang Chen, Guang Li, Alayne Ronnenberg, Hirokatsu Watanabe, Xinru Wang, Louise Ryan, David C. Christiani, Xiping Xu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Tofu is a commonly consumed food in China. Tofu may interfere with lead absorption and retention because of its high calcium content. In this observational study, the authors examined whether dietary tofu intake was associated with blood lead levels among young adults in Shenyang, China. The analyses included 605 men and 550 women who completed baseline questionnaires and had blood lead measurements taken in 1996-1998 as part of a prospective cohort study on reproductive health. Mean blood lead levels were 13.2 μg/dl in men and 10.1 μg/dl in women. Blood lead levels were negatively associated with tofu intake in both genders. A linear trend test showed a 3.7% (0.5-μg/dl) decrease in blood lead level with each higher category of tofu intake (p = 0.003). The highest tofu intake group (≥750 g/week) had blood lead levels 11.3% lower (95% confidence interval: 4.1, 18.0) than those of the lowest tofu intake group (

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1206-1212
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume153
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Soy Foods
Young Adult
China
Reproductive Health
Observational Studies
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Confidence Intervals
Calcium
Food

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Calcium
  • Dietary
  • Lead
  • Linear models
  • Soybeans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Chen, C., Wang, X., Chen, D., Li, G., Ronnenberg, A., Watanabe, H., ... Xu, X. (2001). Tofu consumption and blood lead levels in young Chinese adults. American Journal of Epidemiology, 153(12), 1206-1212. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/153.12.1206

Tofu consumption and blood lead levels in young Chinese adults. / Chen, Changzhong; Wang, Xiaobin; Chen, Dafang; Li, Guang; Ronnenberg, Alayne; Watanabe, Hirokatsu; Wang, Xinru; Ryan, Louise; Christiani, David C.; Xu, Xiping.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 153, No. 12, 15.06.2001, p. 1206-1212.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chen, C, Wang, X, Chen, D, Li, G, Ronnenberg, A, Watanabe, H, Wang, X, Ryan, L, Christiani, DC & Xu, X 2001, 'Tofu consumption and blood lead levels in young Chinese adults', American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 153, no. 12, pp. 1206-1212. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/153.12.1206
Chen, Changzhong ; Wang, Xiaobin ; Chen, Dafang ; Li, Guang ; Ronnenberg, Alayne ; Watanabe, Hirokatsu ; Wang, Xinru ; Ryan, Louise ; Christiani, David C. ; Xu, Xiping. / Tofu consumption and blood lead levels in young Chinese adults. In: American Journal of Epidemiology. 2001 ; Vol. 153, No. 12. pp. 1206-1212.
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