Tobacco-related medical education and physician interventions with parents who smoke: Survey of Canadian family physicians and pediatricians

J. Charles Victor, Joan M. Brewster, Roberta Ferrence, Mary Jane Ashley, Joanna E. Cohen, Peter Selby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between physicians' tobacco-related medical training and physicians' confidence in their tobacco-related skills and smoking-related interventions with parents of child patients. DESIGN: Mailed survey. SETTING: Canada. PARTICIPANTS: The survey was mailed to 800 family physicians and 800 pediatricians across Canada, with a corrected response rate of 65% (N = 900). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Physicians' self-reported tobacco-related education, knowledge, and skills, as well as smoking-related interventions with parents of child patients. Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel x 2 tests were used to examine relationships between variables, controlling for tobacco-control involvement and physician specialty. Data analysis was conducted in 2008. RESULTS: Physicians reporting tobacco-related medical education were more likely to report being "very confident" in advising parents about the effects of smoking and the use of a variety of cessation strategies (P < .05). Furthermore, physicians with tobacco-related training were more likely to help parents of child patients quit smoking whether or not the children had respiratory problems (P < .05). Physicians with continuing medical education in this area were more likely to report confidence in their tobaccorelated skills and to practise more smoking-related interventions than physicians with other forms of training. CONCLUSION: There is a strong relationship between medical education and physicians' confidence and practices in protecting children from secondhand smoke. Physicians with continuing medical education training are more confident in their tobacco-related skills and are more likely to practise smoking-related interventions than physicians with other tobacco-related training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)157-163
Number of pages7
JournalCanadian Family Physician
Volume56
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

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