Tobacco-related medical education and physician interventions with parents who smoke

Survey of Canadian family physicians and pediatricians

J. Charles Victor, Joan M. Brewster, Roberta Ferrence, Mary Jane Ashley, Joanna E Cohen, Peter Selby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between physicians' tobacco-related medical training and physicians' confidence in their tobacco-related skills and smoking-related interventions with parents of child patients. DESIGN: Mailed survey. SETTING: Canada. PARTICIPANTS: The survey was mailed to 800 family physicians and 800 pediatricians across Canada, with a corrected response rate of 65% (N = 900). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Physicians' self-reported tobacco-related education, knowledge, and skills, as well as smoking-related interventions with parents of child patients. Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel x 2 tests were used to examine relationships between variables, controlling for tobacco-control involvement and physician specialty. Data analysis was conducted in 2008. RESULTS: Physicians reporting tobacco-related medical education were more likely to report being "very confident" in advising parents about the effects of smoking and the use of a variety of cessation strategies (P <.05). Furthermore, physicians with tobacco-related training were more likely to help parents of child patients quit smoking whether or not the children had respiratory problems (P <.05). Physicians with continuing medical education in this area were more likely to report confidence in their tobaccorelated skills and to practise more smoking-related interventions than physicians with other forms of training. CONCLUSION: There is a strong relationship between medical education and physicians' confidence and practices in protecting children from secondhand smoke. Physicians with continuing medical education training are more confident in their tobacco-related skills and are more likely to practise smoking-related interventions than physicians with other tobacco-related training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)157-163
Number of pages7
JournalCanadian Family Physician
Volume56
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Family Physicians
Medical Education
Smoke
Tobacco
Parents
Physicians
Smoking
Continuing Medical Education
Canada
Surveys and Questionnaires
Pediatricians
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

Cite this

Tobacco-related medical education and physician interventions with parents who smoke : Survey of Canadian family physicians and pediatricians. / Victor, J. Charles; Brewster, Joan M.; Ferrence, Roberta; Ashley, Mary Jane; Cohen, Joanna E; Selby, Peter.

In: Canadian Family Physician, Vol. 56, No. 2, 02.2010, p. 157-163.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Victor, J. Charles ; Brewster, Joan M. ; Ferrence, Roberta ; Ashley, Mary Jane ; Cohen, Joanna E ; Selby, Peter. / Tobacco-related medical education and physician interventions with parents who smoke : Survey of Canadian family physicians and pediatricians. In: Canadian Family Physician. 2010 ; Vol. 56, No. 2. pp. 157-163.
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