Tobacco policies and on-premise smoking in bars and clubs that cater to young African Americans following the Maryland Clean Indoor Air Act of 2007

Elizabeth D. Nesoff, Adam J. Milam, Lee R Bone, Frances A Stillman, Mieka J. Smart, Kathleen S. Hoke, C. Debra M Furr-Holden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

African American young adults ages 18–25 smoke less than their Caucasian peers, yet the burden of tobacco-related illness is significantly higher in African Americans than in Caucasians across the lifespan. Little is known about how clean indoor air laws affect tobacco smoking among African American young adults. We conducted a systematic observation of bars and clubs with events targeted to African American adults 18–25 in Baltimore City at two timepoints (October and November of 2008 and 2010) after enforcement of the Maryland Clean Indoor Air Act (CIAA). Twenty venues—selected on the basis of youth reports of popular venues—were rated during peak hours. All surveillance checklist items were restricted to what was observable in the public domain. There was a significant decrease in observed indoor smoking after CIAA enforcement. Observed outdoor smoking also decreased, but this change was not significant. Facilities for smoking outdoors increased significantly. The statewide smoking ban became effective February 1, 2008, yet measurable changes in smoking behavior in bars were not evident until the City engaged in stringent enforcement of the ban several months later.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jul 12 2016

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clubs
African Americans
nicotine
Tobacco
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Smoking
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young adult
Young Adult
Baltimore
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life-span
Checklist
Smoke
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surveillance

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • smoking ban
  • tobacco
  • young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Tobacco policies and on-premise smoking in bars and clubs that cater to young African Americans following the Maryland Clean Indoor Air Act of 2007. / Nesoff, Elizabeth D.; Milam, Adam J.; Bone, Lee R; Stillman, Frances A; Smart, Mieka J.; Hoke, Kathleen S.; Furr-Holden, C. Debra M.

In: Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse, 12.07.2016, p. 1-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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