Tobacco control and smoking cessation efforts in an inner-city African American community

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper describes the conceptual framework that guided the development and implementation of a large-scale, community-based health initiative to lower the prevalence of smoking in an urban African American community. This project developed culturally-sensitive approaches to reducing smoking in the community and to promoting tobacco control efforts developed and implemented by community members. A randomized clinical-trial methodology was used to test the efficacy of the culturally-sensitive, community-developed smoking cessation interventions in lowering smoking rates as compared with a self-help approach. Two theoretical models guided the intervention strategies: a macro-level model applicable to the community as a whole, and a psychological process model applicable to individuals. The community model was based on community systems theory and incorporated the Readiness for Change Model, which was applied in both the individual and organizational models. In addition, culturally-sensitive data collection methods were developed to improve the reliability and validity of project data, especially in determining the smoking prevalence rates and smoking behaviors of hard-to-reach, inner-city African Americans. Since the health of individuals is related to the health of their communities, smoking cessation and tobacco control activities that are integrated into the framework of the community (i.e., churches, city-council, housing developments, community organizations), and incorporate culturally-relevant and specific interventions can be effective methods for achieving behavioral and societal change.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-66
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Social Distress and the Homeless
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

Keywords

  • African American
  • Health behavior change
  • Smoking cessation
  • Tobacco control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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