To whom do psychiatrists offer smoking-cessation counseling?

Seth Himelhoch, Gail L Daumit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Individuals with mental illness have high rates of tobacco dependence; however, little is known about what influences a psychiatrist's decision to offer smoking-cessation counseling to smoking patients. Method: Using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, the authors identified 1,610 psychiatric office visits for patients who smoke. They investigated the relationship between patient and visit characteristics and smoking-cessation counseling with logistic regression. Results: Psychiatrists offered cessation counseling at 12.4% of the visits for smoking patients. The adjusted probability of receiving smoking-cessation counseling was significantly higher for those older than 50; for those with a medical diagnosis of obesity, hypertension, or diabetes mellitus; for those in a rural location; and for those having an initial visit. Those with bipolar affective disorder were more likely to receive smoking-cessation counseling than those with depression. Conclusions: Psychiatrists may be missing opportunities to offer smoking-cessation counseling to patients who smoke.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2228-2230
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume160
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2003

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Smoking Cessation
Psychiatry
Counseling
Smoke
Smoking
Health Care Surveys
Office Visits
Tobacco Use Disorder
Mood Disorders
Bipolar Disorder
Diabetes Mellitus
Obesity
Logistic Models
Depression
Hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

To whom do psychiatrists offer smoking-cessation counseling? / Himelhoch, Seth; Daumit, Gail L.

In: American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 160, No. 12, 12.2003, p. 2228-2230.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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