Tissue/planar cell polarity in vertebrates

New insights and new questions

Yanshu Wang, Jeremy Nathans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This review focuses on the tissue/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway and its role in generating spatial patterns in vertebrates. Current evidence suggests that PCP integrates both global and local signals to orient diverse structures with respect to the body axes. Interestingly, the system acts on both subcellular structures, such as hair bundles in auditory and vestibular sensory neurons, and multicellular structures, such as hair follicles. Recent work has shown that intriguing connections exist between the PCP-based orienting system and left-right asymmetry, as well as between the oriented cell movements required for neural tube closure and tubulogenesis. Studies in mice, frogs and zebrafish have revealed that similarities, as well as differences, exist between PCP in Drosophila and vertebrates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)647-658
Number of pages12
JournalDevelopment
Volume134
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2007

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Cell Polarity
Vertebrates
Neural Tube
Hair Follicle
Zebrafish
Sensory Receptor Cells
Anura
Drosophila
Cell Movement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Tissue/planar cell polarity in vertebrates : New insights and new questions. / Wang, Yanshu; Nathans, Jeremy.

In: Development, Vol. 134, No. 4, 02.2007, p. 647-658.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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