Tissue extracellular matrix nanoparticle presentation in electrospun nanofibers

Matt Gibson, Vince Beachley, Jeannine Coburn, Pierre Alain Bandinelli, Hai Quan Mao, Jennifer Hartt Elisseeff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Biomaterials derived from the decellularization of mature tissues retain biological and architectural features that profoundly influence cellular activity. However, the clinical utility of such materials remains limited as the shape and physical properties are difficult to control. In contrast, scaffolds based on synthetic polymers can be engineered to exhibit specific physical properties, yet often suffer from limited biological functionality. This study characterizes composite materials that present decellularized extracellular matrix (DECM) particles in combination with synthetic nanofibers and examines the ability of these materials to influence stem cell differentiation. Mechanical processing of decellularized tissues yielded particles with diameters ranging from 71 to 334 nm. Nanofiber scaffolds containing up to 10% DECM particles (wt/wt) derived from six different tissues were engineered and evaluated to confirm DECM particle incorporation and to measure bioactivity. Scaffolds containing bone, cartilage, and fat promoted osteogenesis at 1 and 3 weeks compared to controls. In contrast, spleen and lung DECM significantly reduced osteogenic outcomes compared to controls. These findings highlight the potential to incorporate appropriate source DECM nanoparticles within nanofiber composites to design a scaffold with bioactivity targeted to specific applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number469120
JournalBioMed Research International
Volume2014
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Nanofibers
Nanoparticles
Extracellular Matrix
Scaffolds (biology)
Tissue
Bioactivity
Scaffolds
Physical properties
Composite materials
Cartilage
Biocompatible Materials
Stem cells
Polymers
Bone
Fats
Osteogenesis
Cell Differentiation
Processing
Stem Cells
Spleen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Tissue extracellular matrix nanoparticle presentation in electrospun nanofibers. / Gibson, Matt; Beachley, Vince; Coburn, Jeannine; Bandinelli, Pierre Alain; Mao, Hai Quan; Elisseeff, Jennifer Hartt.

In: BioMed Research International, Vol. 2014, 469120, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gibson, Matt ; Beachley, Vince ; Coburn, Jeannine ; Bandinelli, Pierre Alain ; Mao, Hai Quan ; Elisseeff, Jennifer Hartt. / Tissue extracellular matrix nanoparticle presentation in electrospun nanofibers. In: BioMed Research International. 2014 ; Vol. 2014.
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