Timing moderates the effects of repeated suggestive interviewing on children's eyewitness memory

Laura Melnyk, Maggie Bruck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The relative role of the timing and repetition of misinformation on the accuracy of children's recall was examined in two experiments. Kindergarten children participated in a magic show and about 40 days later had a memory test. Between the magic show and the memory test, the children were suggestively interviewed either one time in a relatively 'early' interview (temporally closer to the magic show than the memory test) or a relatively 'late' interview (closer to the memory test than the magic show), or in both suggestive interviews. The timing of the suggestive interviewing was manipulated so that the interview was temporally distant from the event or memory test or temporally close to the event or memory test. Repeated interviewing heightened misinformation effects only when the children received the two interview sessions temporally close to the event and memory test.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)613-631
Number of pages19
JournalApplied Cognitive Psychology
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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