Timed sequential therapy for acute myelogenous leukemia: Results of a retrospective study of 301 patients and review of the literature

Kelly J. Norsworthy, Amy E. DeZern, Hua Ling Tsai, Wesley A. Hand, Ravi Varadhan, Steven D. Gore, Ivana Gojo, Keith Pratz, Hetty E. Carraway, Margaret Showel, Michael A. McDevitt, Douglas Gladstone, Gabriel Ghiaur, Gabrielle Prince, Amy H. Seung, Dina Benani, Mark J. Levis, Judith E. Karp, B. Douglas Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Timed sequential therapy (TST) aims to improve outcomes in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) by harnessing drug-induced cell cycle kinetics of AML, where a second drug is timed to coincide with peak leukemia proliferation induced by the first drugs. We analyzed outcomes in 301 newly diagnosed AML patients treated from 2004–2013 with cytarabine, anthracycline, and etoposide TST induction. Median age was 52 (range 20–74) and complete remission rate 68%. With median follow-up 5.8 years, 5-year DFS and overall survival (OS) were 37% (95% CI 31–45%) and 32% (95% CI 27–38%), respectively. In multivariate analysis, older age, unfavorable cytogenetics, and WBC ≥ 50 × 109/L resulted in worse OS. Among patients not undergoing blood and marrow transplant, a propensity score analysis, which reduces imbalance in baseline characteristics, showed consolidation with TST compared with 1 or more cycles high-dose cytarabine trended toward lower DFS and post-remission survival with hazard ratio (HR) 1.9 (95% CI 0.9–4.0), and 1.6 (95% CI 0.7–3.6), respectively. Our results demonstrate the efficacy and feasibility of TST induction for newly diagnosed patients with AML, with results comparable to that seen in clinical trials with other TST therapies and 7 + 3.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-32
Number of pages8
JournalLeukemia Research
Volume61
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2017

Keywords

  • Acute myelogenous leukemia
  • Acute myeloid leukemia
  • Induction chemotherapy
  • Timed sequential therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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