Time course of neuropsychiatric symptoms and cognitive diagnosis in National Alzheimer's Coordinating Centers volunteers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPSs) are nearly universal in cognitive disorders. The mild behavioral impairment construct postulates that NPS may be the first symptom of impending dementia. Methods: Participants were cognitively normal volunteers followed up approximately annually at Alzheimer's Disease Centers, who were assessed on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory and had at least one follow-up visit during which they were diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia. Descriptive statistics were used to determine sequencing of NPS presence with cognitive diagnoses. Results: Data were available for 1998 participants who progressed to MCI or dementia. Over 59% developed NPS before the diagnosis of any cognitive disorder. Depression and irritability were the most common NPSs to precede cognitive diagnoses (24 and 21%, respectively). Discussion: NPSs precede a cognitive diagnosis in most people who develop cognitive decline, both MCI and dementia. These individuals are an important group to focus clinical and research efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)333-339
Number of pages7
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment and Disease Monitoring
Volume11
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's and related dementias
  • Dementia
  • Mild behavioral impairment
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Neuropsychiatric symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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